DOD Presentation: "Personal Safety Awareness with Detainee Operations"

PowerPoint presentation discussing methods for ensuring the safety of staff members at detention camps. Includes being aware of potential attacks and reacting to dangerous situations.

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Friday, June 11, 2004
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Monday, May 30, 2005
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Personal Safety
Awareness
Within
.. Detainee Operations

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Personal Safety Awareness
Action: Discuss appropriate actions to assist all staff members in conducting their duties in a safe manner.
Condition: In a classroom environment, given a conference presentation.
Standard: Perform duties in a safe manner within a detainee camp.
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Personal Safety

Escorting Detainees


Approaching Cell Doors


Walking Underneath Tiers


Cell Searches


Breaking Up Fights


Armed Confrontations


Surrounded by Attackers


Safety Equipment

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ill Radio and Body Alarm ill Whistle ill Flashlight ill Pen and Small Mirror ill Rubber Gloves
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.:. Blading .:. Clenching the Fists .:. Shifting Shoulders Backward .:. Target Glance .:. Conspicuously Looking up .:. 1 ,000-Yard Stare .:. Facial Wipe
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.:. Rocking on Balls of Feet .:. Slight Lowering of Body .:. Growling .:. Facial Coloring .:. Boisterous Profanity .:. Waving Arms and Hands
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When confronted by a potentially
dangerous situation,

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what do you do?

STOP
THINK

REACT
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5 Feet
10 Feet
20 Feet

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What is it?

Less than
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1/4 Second 1/2 Second 1 & 1/4 Second
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Personal Safety
Awareness
Within
Detainee Operations
Summary

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Personal Safety Awareness within Detainee Operations
CD 228 I Version 2004
11 Jun 2004

SECTION I. ADMINISTRATIVE DATA
All Courses Course Number Version Course Title
Including This 31E-POI 2004 Detainee Operations
Lesson

Task(s) Task Number Task Title Taught(*) or Supported
Reinforced Task Number Task Title Task(s)
Academic The academic hours required to teach this lesson are as follows:
Hours Mobilization
Hours/Methods
1 hr I Conference I Discussion
Test ohrs
Test Review ohrs

Total Hours: 1 hr
Test Lesson Lesson No.
Number Testing
(to include test review) N/A

Prerequisite Lesson Number Lesson Title
Lesson(s) CD 240 Conduct Contraband Control Procedures within
Detainee Operations (Searches)

Clearance Security Level: Unclassified
Access Requirements: There are no clearance or access requirements for the lesson.

Foreign Disclosure Restrictions
References
Student Study Assignments
FD7. This product/publication has been reviewed by the product developers in coordination with the Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri 65473 foreign disclosure authority. This product is NOT releasable to students from foreign countries.
Number Title Date Additional Information
AR 385-10 The Army Safety Program. 29 Feb 2000

None.
Instructor One primary instructor. Requirements
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Additional
Name

Man HoursSupport Personnel None
Requirements
Equipment If! Stu Instr Name Ratio Ratio §ill
Required for Instruction None
* Before Id indicates a T ADSS
Materials Required
Instructor Materials:
NOTE: Based on available qualified instructors, facilities and equipment, the
instructor may use computer-assisted powerpoints with projection screen or VGTs
(Vu-graphs) with overhead projector.

Student Materials:
Pen/pencil and notebook.

Classroom, Training Area, and Range Requirements
Ammunition
Requirements If!
None

Instructional NOTE: Before presenting this lesson, instructors must thoroughly prepare by studying this Guidance lesson and identified reference material.
Proponent Position Lesson Plan
£ & 3 MSG SR Corrections Technical 11 Jun 2004
Approvals
Advisor

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SECTION II. INTRODUCTION
Method of Instruction: Conference / Discussion Instructor to Student Ratio is: _________ Time of Instruction: ""5....:..m:..:..i"-'n""s__________ Media: .-:.-N..:.;o"'-'nc:..:e:...-______________
Motivator NOTE: Show Slide #1 (Personal Safety Awareness within Detainee Operations).
You will soon be supervising detainees and as their supervisor you are responsible
for their safety. A lot of the incidents discussed in this class may seem minor or
that common sense could have prevented, however no matter how minor, people
are still unnecessarily injured or killed or property is damaged due to complacency.
As for common sense, some of the same incidents still occur.
NOTE: Show Slides #2 (TLO).
Terminal NOTE: Inform the students of the following Terminal Learning Objective requirements. Learning
At the completion of this lesson, you [the student] will:Objective
Action: Discuss appropriate actions to assist all staff members in conducting their duties in a safe manner.
Conditions: In a classroom environment, given a conference presentation.
Standards: Perform duties in a safe manner within a detainee camp.

Safety Requirements
Safety briefings will be conducted prior to training with emphasis on weather
conditions, existing and predicted; munitions, including the handling and
transporting of blank ammunition and pyrotechnics; and safety while working
around and with machinery, vehicles, and tools. Other topics include hot and cold
weather injury prevention and treatment, animal and insect bites, poisonous plants,
and fire prevention. All injuries/incidents will be reported to the instructor on site
and processed lAW course policies and procedures.
Comply with:
a.
AR 385-10, The Army Safety Program, 29 February 2000.

b.
AR 385-55, Prevention of Motor Vehicle Accidents, 12 March 1987.

c.
TRADOC Regulation 385-2, 27 January 2000.

d.
FM 100-14, Risk Management, 23 April 1998.

e.
FM 101-5, Staff Organization and Operations, 31 May 1997.

NOTE: This is an example of a safety briefing. Safety briefings are dependent on the location of training/training event and this is not to be considered an all-inclusive safety briefing.
1. Electrical storms: (when appropriate) To take precautions against anyone being hit by lightning, we have a dispersal area that is located on
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this range at (give location) (instructors will complete this at their specific
outside location). When directed to disperse, you will move directly to the
dispersal area, ground your rifle and Kevlar and place your poncho over
yourself after lying flat on the ground. In addition, be sure to avoid
flagpoles, wires, Kevlar, and meters that contain electrical charges.
2.
Snakebites: (when appropriate) As you know, the areas in which snakes are generally found during hot weather are cool, damp places such as rotten logs, creek banks, and under roots. In training areas they may be found in fighting supported positions and bunkers. Always observe an area very closely prior to training. In the event that a snake of any type bites you, report it to range personnel, the instructor, or your drill sergeant. Under no circumstances should anyone try to handle a snake.

3.
Heat casualties: (when appropriate). When you are active the body becomes overheated and the perspiration, which is created, cannot evaporate and cool the body because of the high humidity. You become a possible casualty from the heat as the body temperature rises above the normal temperature. The symptoms that this can create are: cool, moist or hot, dry skin; profuse sweating; headaches; dizziness; weakness; rapid pulse; or severe cramps in the abdomen or legs. Instructors, range personnel, drill sergeants, and company cadre are familiar with first aid treatments and casualty evacuation procedures for further medical attention. During hot weather, drink water at a rate of not more than 1.5 quarts per hour and not more than 12 quarts per day. Use the buddy system and watch your buddies for signs of heat illness.

4.
Cold weather injuries: (when appropriate) Range OIC will ensure that warm-ups are properly utilized. Ten-minute breaks will be scheduled for each 50-minute block of instruction. During conference sessions, individuals should be allowed to move their feet, hands, etc., in order to maintain circulation. Supervisors at every level will ensure that their subordinates are adequately protected during cold weather. Range OIC will coordinate with company personnel to rotate Soldiers into warm-up tents when inclement weather conditions dictate the need for this to preserve troop health.

5.
Weapons Handling: Do not fire blank ammunition at individuals within a distance of 25 meters. Ensure blank adapters are installed on weapons before ammunition is issued. Blank adapters will be installed on weapons at all times. When utilizing MILES equipment, never look directly into the laser engagement transmitter.

6.
Classroom Instruction: Inform students of the procedures and exits in the classroom in the event of an emergency and/or fire.

7.
If in need of a MEDEVAC helicopter, immediately contact the MEDEVAC Operations Center telephonically, either by calling through the Range Control Switchboard or by radio. If emergency care is needed, all medical support for units training outside the cantonment area should contact the local 911 for emergency care.

8.
Be responsible for security of weapons.

9.
Ensure proper use of pyrotechnics and blank ammunition.

NOTE: Ensure all students have been given the safety brief. Have those arriving late due to appointments and sick call read the briefing.
Risk Low Assessment Level
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DOD 009265
Environmental NOTE: It is the responsibility of all soldiers and DA civilians to protect the environment from
Considerations damage. Caring for the environment begins with the Army's vision of environmental responsibility. The following vision statement describes what the Army expects of all Soldiers and leaders:
Vision Statement: "The Army will integrate environmental values into its mission
in order to sustain readiness, improve the Soldier's quality oflife, strengthen
community relationships, and provide sound stewardship ofresources. "
Taking care of the environment protects health, safety, and natural resources. For
example, when fuel spills on the ground, it soaks into the soil, poisons plants, and
eventually enters streams and lakes that supply drinking water. (See

for more information.)
Caring for the environment also supports the Army mission. Costly environmental cleanups detract from Army readiness. During war, many wise tactical, medical, or operations-security (OPSEC) practices are also good environmental practices. Handling fuels safely, maintaining vehicles, disposing of solid waste/hazardous waste (HW), and managing and turning in ammunition properly are sound environmental and tactical considerations that carryover from training into combat operations.
Many practices that damage the environment waste time and do not lead to success in combat. One example occurred during the Gulf War when Iraqi Soldiers set fire to Kuwaiti oil fields and poured millions of gallons of crude oil into the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi Army deliberately damaged environmental resources and wasted valuable time and effort on activities that did not stop the allies' advance. Remember, environmental stewardship does not prevent the Army from fighting and winning wars-it supports the Army mission.
Training will be conducted in the proper designated areas only. This ensures natural and environmental resources are maintained properly for continued training realism. All spills of hazardous property and POL products will be reported to the appropriate environmental office. The activity responsible for the spill will contain the spill to reduce further environmental and training area degradation. Equipment will be operated to conform to environmental operating permits. Live foliage will not be used as camouflage material. Improper disposal of trash and refuse, inadequate cleanup of training areas pollutes ground water resources, and may result in a potential health or safety hazard.
References: Field Manual 3-1 OO.4/MCRP 4-11 B, Environmental Considerations in Military Operations, dated 15 June 2000; w/change #1 dated 11 May 2001.
Training Circular 3-34.489, The Soldier and the Environment, dated 8 May 2000; with change number 1, dated 26 October 2001.
Evaluation None.
Instructional
Safety in a detainee camp relates to most of the classes you will receive.
Lead-In
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SECTION III. PRESENTATION
1. Learning Step / Activity 1.
Method of Instruction: Conference / Discussion Time of Instruction: 40 mins Media: -None-
NOTE: Show Slides #3 (Personal Safety).
1. We will discuss the situations listed.
a.
Safety rules to be observed when escorting detainees. Never walk on the strong side of a detainee when escorting him. This will facilitate him being able to strike you with the full force of his strength. Always walk to the side and slightly to the rear of a detainee out of his reach, this will allow you an opportunity to move out of the way if he attempts to assault you. When necessary escort an unruly detainee with to staff members lAW local SOP.

b.
Safety practices when approaching cell doors and when walking underneath the tiers. When approaching a cell door never walk with your head down and so close that if the door was to be opened by the detainee that the door would hit you. When walking under a tier with a multiple levels always look up before moving out from underneath, as things may hit you from above when you least expect it.

c.
Always look up. Whenever you enter or leave a building or cellblock it is good practice to look up as well as left and right.

d.
Watch the detainee's hands. When observing detainees on a routine basis watching what is in their hands may make the difference between becoming a victim of assault and preventing one.

e.
Use the windows to see the reflection like a mirror. Utilizing any reflective device in a detainee camp such as someone's glasses or a window will enhance your ability to be more aware of your surroundings and see a potentially dangerous situation in its infancy allowing you quicker reaction time to quell any type of unruly behavior.

f.
Safety rules pertaining to cell searches. Never slide your fingers or hand along any area of a detainee camp as it may contain a sharp item that was placed there to cut or stab you.

g.
Proper procedure for breaking up an altercation between detainees. Never try to step between a physical altercation between two or more detainees. Direct them to stop their behavior verbally, if they refuse sound the alarm and wait for backup to arrive before using physical force to stop the incident.

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h. Proper action to take if suddenly confronted by an armed detainee. Always be aware of your surroundings and know where your avenues of escape from any area of the camp so that if you are confronted by a potential attacker you will be able to effectively move out. If you are unable to escape try to move to a position where there is some type of object between you and your attacker and attempt to deescalate the situation with your IPC skills or sound the alarm and wait for other staff to come to your aide.
NOTE: Show Slides #4 (Safety Equipment).
NOTE: SHOW JOB AIDS: I.E., WHISTLE, RUBBER GLOVES, MIRROR, FLASHLIGHT, AND RADIO.
2. We will discuss the job aids available to detainee camp staff, the equipment that is designed to make our job safer, such as the body alarms, radios, mirrors, rubber gloves, flashlights, etc ...
NOTE: Pass around each job aid and discuss its application with regards to working inside a detainee camp.
NOTE: Show Slides # 5 and # 6 (Pre-attack Cues).
3. We will discuss and identify PRE-ATTACK CUES, to help you be aware and look for the warning signs of a potential physical attack.
a.
BLADING -this is shifting one foot in back of the other, so the detainee can move toward you more easily.

b.
CLENCHING THE FISTS -to prepare a potential attacker for attack by lubricating the finger joints, and to keep themselves under control.

c.
SHIFTING THE SHOULDERS BACK -to give you a message that he means business, as well as providing a certain amount of protection for himself, or as preparation before STRIKING YOU.

d.
TARGET GLANCE -looking for a weapon to attack with or an area on your body to strike.

e.
CONSPICUOUSLY LOOKING UP -a potential attacker may be trying to distract you by looking in a certain direction, prior to a surprise attack, or checking out his post-attack escape route.

f.
THOUSAND-YARD STARE -a potential attacker may try to depersonalize you, by looking straight through you. (A good example of this can be seen in the movie "The Silence of the Lambs" when Anthony Hopkins looks at Jody Foster as if she wasn't even there.)

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g.
FACIAL WIPE -hiding or averting the face. (Sometimes people who are on the verge of losing control of themselves perform a facial wipe, by which they attempt to hide the level of anxiety they're experiencing by physically moving their hands over their faces. This may show up as removing a hat, slicking back the hair, or something equally inconspicuous.)

h.
ROCKING ON THE BALLS OF THE FEET -as a potential attacker gets more upset, these movements act as a means of diffusing their overload of adrenaline and anxiety.

i.
LOWERING THE BODY SLIGHTLY -causing the head to lower, just before moving into the attack.

j.
GROWLING -at the climax of their fear or anger, some humans even growl before they attack.

k.
FACIAL COLORING -changing from flushed to pale. (The body is moving blood from the extremities to the internal organs, to protect them in case of injury.

I.
BOISTEROUS PROFANITY -a potential attacker will sometimes speak loud and yell words or profanity to demoralize you in an attempt to intimidate you, prior to attack.

m.
WAVING ARMS AND HANDS -a potential attacker will wave their arms and hands rapidly as they speak, in an attempt to distract you prior to attack.

NOTE: BE AWARE OF AND LOOK FOR THESE BEHAVIORS AND CUES, AS THEY ARE CLEAR SIGNS OF DANGER, BEING ABLE TO OBSERVE AND DETECT THESE CUES AND TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTIONS WILL MAKE THE DETERMINATION WHETHER OR NOT YOU WILL SAFELY ACCOMPLISH YOUR DUTIES.
NOTE: Show Slide # 7 (React to Danger).
NOTE: THERE ARE THREE GENERAL STEPS TO TAKE WHEN CONFRONTED BY A POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS SITUATION THAT MAY FEEL UNSAFE.
1.
STOP (WHAT YOU ARE DOING).

2.
THINK (OBSERVE THE SITUATION, AND ASSESS THE DANGER).

3.
REACT (TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTION).

NOTE: Show Slide # 8 (Reaction Time).
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QUESTION: WHAT IS REACTION TIME?
ANSWER: THE AVERAGE AMOUNT OF TIME YOUR BODY WILL REACT TO A GIVEN SITUATION.
QUESTION: WHAT IS THE AVERAGE REACTION TIME IF YOU WERE ATTACKED BY A POTENTIAL ATTACKER THAT IS APPROXIMATELY FIVE FEET AWAY FROM YOU?
ANSWER: LESS THAN 1 QUARTER OF A SECOND.
QUESTION: WHAT IS THE AVERAGE REACTION TIME IF YOU WERE ATTACKED BY A DETAINEE THAT IS APPROXIMATELY TEN FEET AWAY FROM YOU?
ANSWER: LESS THAN 1 HALF OF A SECOND.
QUESTION: WHAT IS THE AVERAGE REACTION TIME IF YOU WERE
ATTACKED BY A DETAINEE THAT IS APPROXIMATELY TWENTY FEET AWAY
FROM YOU?
ANSWER: LESS THAN 1 AND 1 QUARTER SECOND.
NOTE: Whenever you are encountering a potentially dangerous situation where you may become a victim of a potential attacker ALWAYS remember that he will always act faster than you think he will and you will always react slower than you think you will.
NOTE: Answer students' questions using your experiences.
NOTE: Conduct a check on learning and summarize the learning activity.
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SECTION IV. SUMMARY
Method of Instruction: Conference I Discussion
Instructor to Student Ratio is:
Time of Instruction: -'=5:....;m:...:..:..:..:in.:..::s"--_________
Media: -None-

Check on Determine if students have learned the material presented by:
Learning
a. Soliciting student questions and explanations.
b. Asking questions and getting answers from the students.
c. Providing immediate feedback in context to the material presented and
correcting student misunderstandings.

Review I Summarize Lesson
NOTE: Show Slide # 9 (Summary)
1.
RETAIN ATTENTION: As a staff member working in a detainee camp you will be responsible for the detainees safety as well as other staff members safety not too mention your own.

2.
SUMMARY: Supervising detainees includes enforcing safety standards, recognizing safety hazards and ensuring that safety equipment is being properly used. While performing your duties you will have to stay alert to ensure you perform your duties in a safe manner.

3.
CLOSING STATEMENT: You, as the detainees' immediate supervisor will be the person in the position to ensure the detainees follow established safety standards. The way you handle this responsibility could reduce or increase the amount of incidents in a detainee camp.

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SECTION v. STUDENT EVALUATION
Testing None Requirements
None.
Feedback NOTE: Feedback is essential to effective learning. Schedule and provide feedback on the
Requirements evaluation and any information to help answer students' questions. Provide remedial
training as needed.
a. Schedule and provide immediate feedback in context to the material presented;
correct student misunderstandings.
b. Provide remedial training as needed.

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Appendix A -Viewgraph Masters (N/A)
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Appendix B -Test(s) and Test Solution(s) (N/A)
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Appendix C -Practical Exercises and Solutions (N/A)
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Appendix D -Student Handouts (N/A)
D-1 Cl0207

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