Army Regulation 190-12: Military Police Military Working Dogs Regulations

Regulations establishing responsibilities policies and procedures for direction, management & control of Army military working dog (MWD) program. Primary uses for MWD: Patrol dogs, Narcotics/Contraband detection, Explosives detection. Other listed uses include "Enemy prisoner of war control" (4-3, p10). No regulations specific to enemy POW control; general use of force regulations (4-2, p9): "release of MWD to apprehend a person suspected of commiting a serious offense is the minimum force necessary when the alternative is escape or the use of deadly force." "When necessary, the dog's ability to deliver a bite of pressure provides an added dimension of physical force as an alternative to the use of deadly force." (4-1).

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USAPD
ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING SYSTEM OneCol FORMATTER WIN32 Version 214
PIN: 007072-000 DATE: 03-30-04 TIME: 12:56:56 PAGES SET: 99
DATA FILE: C:\wincomp\r190-47.fil DOCUMENT: AR 190-47
SECURITY:UUNCLASSIFIED DOC STATUS: REVISION
Army Regulation 190-12
Military Police

Military Working Dogs
Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 30 September 1993
UNCLASSIFIED

SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 190-12
Military Working Dogs

This revision

o Requires coordination with HQDA (DAMOODL) prior to returning a military
working dog to the 341st Military Working Dog Training Squadron (para 21e).

o Identifies a new national stock number for the requisition of small breed
narcotic detector dogs (para 23c(1)(d)).

o Addresses narcotic and contraband detector dog team certification and
proficiency training (paras 33 and 34).

o Advises Canine Explosive Scent Kits can be requisitioned through local supply
channels, and identifies additional criteria for the procurement of explosive
training aids (para 36) .

o Prescribes that a military working dog (MWD) team on TDY for periods in excess
of 30 days will be accompanied by the dog's health certificate, prepared and
signed by a veterinarian no more than 10 days prior to embarkation (para 41f).

o Adds guidance for using military explosive detection dog assets for VIP
missions (para 48).

o Requires coordination of new construction of kennel facilities with the
supporting veterinary activity and the Chief of Engineers (para 51b).

o Advises commanders to conduct a 6month post certification inspection to
ensure corrective action has been taken on previously identified deficiencies
and shortcomings (para 61c).

o Moves instructions for completing MWD administrative records (DA forms) from
chapter 6 to appendix B (app B).

o Adds instructions for providing required MWD information to HQDA (DAMOODLS)
(app C).

o Authorizes exact replication of any DA or DD forms prescribed in this
regulation that are generated by the automated Military Police Management
Information System in place of the official printed version of the form (app

A, sec III).

DODDOA-004811

Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 30 September 1993
By Order of the Secretary of the Army:
GORDON R. SULLIVAN
General, United States Army Chief of Staff
Official:

MILTON H. HAMILTON
Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army
History. This UPDATE printing
publishes a revision of this publication. Because the publication has been extensively revised, the changed portions have not been highlighted.
Summary. This regulation covers re­sponsibilities, policies, and procedures for the direction, management, and control of the Army military working dog program to include the assignment and functions of military working dog teams. It prescribes the standards for selection and retention
Military Police
Military Working Dogs
of handlers and dogs, training and em­ployment of military dog teams, and use of force.
Applicability. This regulation applies to the Active Army, the U.S. Army Reserve, and the Army National Guard. It applies to all personnel who are involved in the care, training, and employment of Army military working dogs. This regulation ap­plies during partial and full mobilization.

Proponent and exception authority.
The proponent of this regulation is the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans (DCSOPS). The DCSOPS has the authority • to approve exceptions to this regulation that are consistent with control­ling law and regulation. The DCSOPS may delegate this authority in writing to a division chief within the proponent agency in the grade of colonel or the ci­vilian equivalent.

Army management control process.
This regulation is subject to the require­ments of AR 112. It contains internal con­trol provisions but does not contain checklists for conducting internal control reviews. These checklists are contained in DA Circular 11892.
Supplementation. Supplementation of
*Army Regulation 190-12
Effective 30 October 1993
this regulation and establishment of com­mand and local forms are prohibited with­out prior approval from HQDA (DAMOODLS), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 203100400.
Interim changes. Interim changes to this regulation are not official unless they are authenticated by the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army. Users will destroy interim changes on their expiration dates unless sooner super­seded or rescinded.
Suggested improvements. Users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements through established com­mand channels, on DA Form 2028 (Rec­ommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to HQDA (DAMOODLS), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 203100400.
Distribution. Distribution of this publi­cation is made in accordance with the re­quirements on DA Form 1209E, block 2568, intended for all command levels A, B, C, D, and E for Active Army, Army National Guard, and the U.S. Army Reserve.
Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number)
Chapter 1 General, page 1 Purpose • 1-1, page 1 References • 1-2, page 1 Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1-3, page 1 Responsibilities • 1-4, page 1 Waivers • 1 -5, page 2
Chapter 2 Authorizations/Requisitions for Military Working Dogs and Handlers, page 2 Authorizations • 2-1, page 2 Requisition planning for military working dogs • 2 -2, page 3 Requisition procedures • 2-3, page 3
This regulation supersedes AR 19012. 15 December 1984.
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993

UNCLASSIFIED DODDOA-004812
Contents—Continued
Preparation of military working dogs for overseas movement • 2-4, page 4 Reassignment of MWD teams from an overseas area • 2-5, page 5

Chapter 3
Training of Military Working Dog Teams, page 5
Training and retraining • 3-1, page 5
Explosives detector dog team certification • 3-2, page 7
Narcotic and contraband detector dog team certification • 3-3, page 7 Proficiency training of detector dogs • 3-4, page 7
Narcotics and contraband training aids • 3-5, page 7
Explosives training aids • 3-6, page 8
Training assistance team(s) • 3-7, page 8

Chapter 4
Utilization of Military Working Dog Teams, page 9
General utilization requirements • 4-1, page 9
Use of force • 4-2, page 9
Potential of military working dogs • 4-3, page 10
Patrol dogs • 4-4, page 10
Narcotics/contraband detector dogs • 4-5, page 10 Explosives detector dogs • 4-6, page 11 Explosives detector dog team assistance to civil authorities • 4-7, page 11
Using military EDD assets for VIP missions • 4-8, page 12
Chapter 5 Kennel Facilities and Care of Dogs, page 12
Kennel facilities • 5-1, page 12
Warning signs • 5-2, page 12
Care and grooming • 5-3, page 13
Feeding requirements • 5-4, page 13
Veterinary care • 5-5, page 13

Chapter 6
Administration, page 13
Inspections • 6-1, page 13
Records • 6-2, page 13
Accountability of military working dogs • 6-3, page 14
Shipping crates • 6-4, page 14

Appendixes
A. References, page 15
B. Forms, page 16

C. Required MWD Information, page 20
Glossary
Index

ii. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004813
Chapter 1 General
1-1. Purpose
This regulation prescribes responsibilities, policies, and procedures for the direction, management, and control of the Army military working dog (MWD) program. It also explains how MWD teams are used in military police (MP) combat support, law enforcement and security operations, to include narcotics and explosives detection. This regulation is to be used with AFR 4008/AR 70081/OPNAVINST 10570.1/MCO 10570.1 (hereinafter referred to as AR 70081) and DA Pamphlet 19012.
1-2. References
Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.
1-3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the consolidated glossary.
1-4. Responsibilities
a. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans (DCSOPS) will have overall responsibility for the MWD program to include:
(1)
Developing policies, standards, and procedures for the management of the Army MWD program and for the care, training, and employment of Army MWDs.

(2)
Serving as a voting member of the Joint Services Military Working Dog Committee.

(3)
Serving as the central coordinating point between Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force; other military services; Federal, State, and local authorities concerning the training and utilization of MWD teams.

(4)
Monitoring development of training requirements and equipment for dogs and dog handlers and ensuring that training meets Army combat support, law enforcement, and security mission needs.

(5)
Assisting in the development of design criteria for kennel facilities in coordination with the Chief of Engineers (COE) and The Surgeon General (TSG).

(6)
Reviewing requests from major Army commands (MACOMs) for changes to unit authorizations for existing MWD programs or for new MWD programs.

(7)
Reviewing and approving force requirements for MWD teams in coordination with HQDA (DAMOODLS) and the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistic (DCSLOG).

(8)
Monitoring training of MWDs and handlers.

(9)
Compile data submitted by MACOMs and prepare MWD reports according to appendix C.

b.
The Commander, U.S. Total Army Personnel Command (PERSCOM), will

(1)
Develop training requirements for dog handlers in coordination with HQDA (DAMOODLS). Training require­ments forecast will be provided to the 341st Miiitary Working Dog Training Squadron (MWDTS), US Air Force (USAF), as required.

(2)
Coordinate training of and assign MWD handlers to authorized positions. Provide for the career management of Army dog handlers.

c.
The DCSLOG will

(1)
Provide all procurement and supply functions prescribed in AR 70081, DOD Dog Program.

(2)
Assist in development and procurement of equipment for MWD training.

(3)
Budget and fund for MWDs and support equipment.

d.
The COE will develop designs for MWD kennel facilities in coordination with HQDA (DAMOODLS) and TSG.

e.
The Surgeon General (TSG) will

(1)
Assist in the development of design criteria for MWD kennel facilities in coordination with HQDA (DAMOODLS) and COE.

(2)
Provide complete veterinary health care services for MWDs, to include medical evaluation of dogs' fitness for duty.

(3)
Provide professional guidance to commanders and training to handlers for animal health husbandry including care; first aid; nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) protective measures for animals; feeding; kennel design; and sanitation.

f The Commander, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), will

(1)
Develop plans and procedures for training of dogs, dog handlers, and supervisory personnel. The commander also will ensure that sufficient numbers of instructors are assigned to meet annual Army training requirements.

(2)
Develop employment doctrine for the Army MWD program for MP combat support and peacetime missions.

(3)
Develop Army dog training equipment requirements in coordination with the 341st MWDTS and the Air Training Command.

1
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U
(4)
Develop training assistance team(s) of appropriately trained and experienced MWD handlers, kennelmasters, and/or trainers, and provide training assistance to commands whose requests for training assistance have been approved by ODCSOPS.

(5)
Compile data submitted by subordinate commands and prepare MWD reports according to appendix C.

g.
Commander, U.S. Army Aviation and Troop Command (ATCOM), will

(1)
Serve as commodity manager of Army MWDs.

(2)
Compile data submitted by MACOMs and prepare the Army MWD worldwide asset report as required by AR 70081, paragraph 12.

h.
Commanders of MACOMs will

(1)
Include requirements and authorizations for MWDs in applicable documents per AR 31049.

(2)
Budget for logistic support not otherwise provided.

(3)
Provide supervision to subordinate units, installations, or activities to ensure effective management of MWD programs and utilization of MWD team assets.

(4)
Establish a certification program to ensure the proficiency of MWD teams.

(5)
Compile data submitted from subordinate commands and prepare MWD reports according to appendix C.

i.
Unit, installation, and activity commanders will

(I)
Initiate MWD programs based upon the evaluation of the threat, current and future missions, and MACOM guidance.

(2)
Support the MWD program in accordance with policies outlined in this regulation and procedures outlined in DA Pam 19012.

(3)
Initiate and submit MWD program administrative reports in accordance with appendix C.

j.
The USAF serves as the single manager of the DOD Dog Program and is responsible for procurement, materiel management, and initial training of MWDs and handlers for the DOD. The 341st MWDTS at Lackland AFB, TX, is the only DOD agency authorized to procure MWDs.

1-5. Waivers
a.
The DCSOPS has the authority to approve waivers to this regulation. Only waivers that are consistent with controlling law and regulation may be approved. The DCSOPS may delegate this authority in writing to a division chief within ODCSOPS who holds the grade of at least colonel or the civilian equivalent. The approval authority will coordinate all questions regarding the scope of authority to approve waivers with HQDA (DAJAAL), Washington, DC 203102200.

b.
When provisions of this regulation cannot be met, MACOMs may request a waiver (see the glossary for explanation), as appropriate. Requests for waivers will be forwarded in•writing to HQDA (DAMOODLS), 400 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 203100400. Waivers normally will be granted for a period of one year and may be extended only after a review of the circumstances necessitating the extension. The requesting activity will maintain a record of the approved waiver.

Chapter 2 Authorizations/Requisitions for Military Working Dogs and Handlers
2-1. Authorizations
A combat support mission and/or crime analysis and a commitment to fund and build kennel facilities are prerequisites to the authorization of MWD teams.
a. Commanders requesting the use of MWD teams will
(1)
Review and analyze the physical security and crime experience at the installation to determine whether there are requirements for, and justification to warrant, the use of MWD teams. Modified table of organization and equipment (MTOE) unit commanders should also review and analyze combat support missions and requirements that can reasonably be supported by employment of MWD teams. Guidelines are in DA Pam 19012.

(2)
Initiate action to construct permanent kennel facilities that will be complete and available for use within 1 year after arrival of dogs at the unit, installation, or activity. The MACOM should provide guidance on temporary kennel requirements.

(3)
Submit request of authorization upon determination that the installation security and law enforcement needs and/ or the combat support missions will support dog and handler team requirements. The request will include:

(a)
The results of the security and crime analysis, and/or the combat support mission analysis.

(b)
A justification for the types of dog teams requested (for example, patrol, patrol/narcotics detector, and/or patrol/ explosives detector).

(c)
Handler grade authorizations on MTOE or table of distribution and allowance (TDA), per the standards of grade

2 AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004815
authorization (SGA) in AR 611201. The SGA and additional skill identifiers (AS!) for dog handlers are explained in chapter 3.
(d)
Verification that handlers will be drawn from existing command MP personnel resources (that is, no new manpower).

(e)
Necessary travel and temporary duty (TDY) costs to be funded and command action initiated to construct permanent kennel facilities (indicate a projected completion date).

(f)
A request for equipment changes to authorization in MTOE/TDA. This request will be forwarded through command channels per AR 31049.

b.
MACOM commanders will review requests from subordinate units for MWD team authorizations to ensure that these requests are valid and fully justified, and that personnel and facilities are available to support the proposed programs. Existing MWD programs will be reviewed periodically to ensure that dog team assets are properly used and that justification of assets remains valid. When dog team assets are reduced or increased, appropriate changes to . both personnel and equipment authorizations of MTOE/TDA will be processed per AR 31034 and AR 31049.

c.
Unit, installation, and activity commanders will report authorized and assigned dog assets and utilization to their respective MACOM. MACOM commanders will report authorized and assigned dog assets and utilization by unit, installation, or activity to the Commander, ATCOM (AMSTRMSFC), 4300 Goodfellow Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 631201798. Report frequency and requirements are contained in appendix c.

d.
Qualified MWDs that are surplus to the authorizations of the using installation or organization will be reported to their respective MACOM provost marshal. The MACOM provost marshal may direct reassignment of the MWD, in coordination with PERSCOM, to another activity within that MACOM. MWDs excess to the needs of the MACOM will be reported to the Commander, PERSCOM (TAPCEPLM), 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 223310400, for reassignment.

e.
MWDs will be returned to the 341st MWDTS, Lackland AFB, TX, only when authorized and approved by HQDA (DAMOODLS).

(1)
HQDA(DAMOODLS) will coordinate this action with the Director, 341st MWDTS, and Chief, DOD Military Dog Veterinary Service.

(2)
As a rule, the 341st MWDTS does not retrain dogs which have become ineffective.

(3)
When necessary, ineffective dogs may be retrained by a training assistance team.

(4)
MACOM commanders will notify the Commander, ATCOM, in writing whenever an MWD has died or undergoes euthanasia.

22. Requisition planning for military working dogs
-
a. MWDs are requisitioned according to the following criteria:
(1)
When a new authorization for MWDs is approved, the approval document will be cited as the authority for the requisition, pending addition to unit authorization documents.

(2)
When a dog dies or undergoes euthanasia.

(3)
When a dog is diagnosed by a veterinarian as having a medical condition which is expected to result ir, death or permanent disability, and the dog will be unable to perform the duties for which it is trained. Requisitions normally will be submitted immediately; however, if the dog's useful life is projected as being greater than 1 year, the requisition will be submitted 12 months prior to the projected loss of the dog.

b.
If a dog becomes medically (physically) unfit or unable to perform as an MWD, or has a terminal condition, euthanasia is authorized. (See DA Pam 19012 for details.)

c.
Replacement requirements must be identified as early as possible. It is not necessary to wait until a dog dies to requisition a replacement.

2-3. Requisition procedures
Requisition of an MWD team (dog and handler) requires two separate transactions. Handlers are obtained as a result of a personnel action. Dogs are obtained as a result of a logistical action. MWDs and handlers will normally be assigned and moved together as teams. Commanders will assign an appropriately qualified handler to every MWD on hand. Assignment will be consistent with the policy of "one dogone handler." No MWD should be without a handler unless all qualified handlers have been assigned to a dog and no other handlers are assigned to the unit or installation. Distribution or redistribution of qualified handlers to meet dog handling requirements will be coordinated with TAPCEPLM. Dogs and handlers assigned together as teams will be employed together as teams. Mandatory utilization requirements of ASItrained handler personnel are specified in AR 600200.
a. Replacement of an MWD team.
(1)
The standard method to be used to replace an MWD and handler team which has been reassigned will be to

(a)
Identify a qualified candidate from assigned NIP personnel, consistent with the SGA.

(b)
Obtain a handler training quota from PERSCOM.

3
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
(c)
Submit a requisition in Military Standard Requisitioning and Issue Procedures (MILSTRIP) format to ATCOM to replace the dog.

(2)
If a qualified candidate is not available, or when PERSCOM identifies an alreadytrained replacement MWD team, a personnel requisition will be submitted. Personnel requisitions for a replacement handler will identify the current ASI. All requisitions will be for authorized and required manpower spaces.

b. Replacement of the handler only.
(1)
The standard method to be used to replace a handler who has left the Army (or who has otherwise been removed from the MWD program) will be to take either of the following actions:

(a)
Identify and assign a qualified handler to the dog.

(b)
Identify a qualified candidate from assigned MP personnel, consistent with the SGA. Obtain a handler training quota from Commander, PERSCOM, and train a new handler at the 341st MWDTS, Lackland, AFB, TX.

(2)
Dogs without handlers will be reported to the MACOM provost marshal. If the MACOM provost marshal is unable to locate and assign a qualified handler, this will be reported to TAPCEPLM and DAMOODLS. The MWD may be sent to an installation that has a handler who is not assigned a dog. When the dog is reassigned, it will be necessary to replace the complete MWD team, as described above, by training a new handler and requisitioning a new dog.

(3)
A handler assigned MWD program supervisory responsibilities (that is, kennelmaster) may be authorized to handle the assigned dog at the discretion of the local commander or provost marshal.

(4)
The goals are to train and employ dogs and handlers together as teams and minimize the amount of time a trained dog is not assigned to a qualified handler.

c.
Replacement of the dog only. Authorized dogs are requisitioned per AR 70081.

(1)
Initial requisitions for dogs should be submitted when manpower spaces for handlers are authorized. The MV/Ds currently being trained for the Army are shown below.

(a)
Patrol; line item number (LIN) G33690; national stock number (NSN) 8820004359005.

(b)
Patrol/narcotics detector; LIN D33800; NSN 8820002437542.

(c)
Patrol/explosives detector; LIN G33742; NSN 20001883880.

(d)
Small Breed Detector Dog Narcotic; NSN 8820012713829.

(2)
The standard method to be used to replace an MWD which has died (or undergoes euthanasia) will be to submit a requisition in MILSTRIP format which includes a statement that the unit or installation already has a trained handler. Explosives detector dogs (EDD) and handlers must be certified together as a team. New EDDs and/or new EDD handlers will be trained and initially certified together as a team only at the 341st MWDTS. Rectification of an EDD team composed of a previously trained EDD and EDD handler may be certified by an Army appointed certification authority (as defined in para 31c) or accomplished at the 341st MWDTS.

(3)
Units, installations, or activities will send requisitions in MILSTRIP format to their MACOM for new or replacement dogs.

(a)
The request will be accompanied by a written verification that the dogs requested are authorized by MTOE/ TDA.

(b)
The authorizing document number will be cited.

(c)
Requisitions normally are filled on a firstcome, firstserve basis.

(4)
MACOMs will submit all requisitions to the Commander, ATCOM, ATTN: AMSTRMSFC, 4300 Goodfellow Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 631201798, for review and approval.

(5)
After approving requisition requests, ATCOM will forward all requisitions to Headquarters, Air Force Security Police Agency (HQ, AFSPA), ATTN: SPLE, Kirtland AFB, NM 871176001, for review. Dog requisitions will be filled for:

(a)
A newly authorized dog requirement.

(b)
A replacement for a deceased dog or one scheduled for euthanasia.

(c)
A replacement for a 'dog diagnosed by a veterinarian as having a medical condition that will result in decertification or euthanasia within 12 months.

(6)
In addition, all requisitions must be accompanied by documentation to support the request for a new dog. All requests for dogs that do not have the proper accompanying documentation will be returned without action to the requesting MACOM. Documentation must be in the form of:

(a)
TDA paperwork for reason cited in para (5Xa) above.

(b)
Copy of death certificate for reasons cited in para (5)(b) above.

(c)
Medical certificate signed by the attending veterinarian for reasons cited in para (5)(c) above. Any certificate received signed by anyone other than the attending veterinarian is unacceptable.

(7)
All requisitions for dogs will be reviewed by HQ, AFSPA, prior to being processed by the 341st MWDTS.

2-4. Preparation of military working dogs for overseas movement
a. All dogs will be given a physical examination at the unit of origin within 7 days of shipment to the port of
4U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993

DODDOA-004817
— _ _
embarkation (POE). If a military veterinarian is not available, this examination may be given by a civilian veterinarian under the provisions of AR 403 and AR 40905. Dogs will be evaluated to be reasonably sure that the dog will be able to complete its overseas assignment with minimal medical difficulty.
b. The following actions will be accomplished prior to shipment overseas:
(1)
Vaccination against rabies, canine distemper, canine adenovirus type 1 or type 2, leptospirosis, canine Par­vovirus, and parainfluenza (if dog has not been vaccinated for these diseases within the past 6 months). The attending veterinarian will ensure immunizations are current and consistent with the requirements of destination (local, state, and national) regulations. Ample notification must be given to the veterinarian to accomplish immunization and medical examination prior to shipment. Other vaccinations and treatments will be administered at the discretion of the Army veterinarian.

(2)
Treatment to eliminate external and internal parasites prior to shipment.

(3)
Clean teeth, if needed.

c.
All dogs will be accompanied by health certificates and Rabies vaccination certificates, prepared and signed by a veterinarian no more than 7 days prior to embarkation. The complete medical record will be carried by the handler or other assigned military escort (handler qualified).

d.
Normally, only dogs under 8 years of age and in excellent health will be shipped overseas. However, all dogs are eligible for movement provided the veterinarian has given clearance for movement, and the expected lifetime of the dog will meet the normal tour length in the gaining command. Dogs with disease conditions that might adversely affect performance or require extensive veterinary care will not be shipped. The inability of the dog to be assigned overseas will not serve as a reason to delay the reassignment of the handler overseas. Additional instructions for overseas movement are noted in DA Pam 19012, chapter 7, section III.

2-5. Reassignment of MWD teams from an overseas area
a.
Provisions of paragraphs 24a, b, and c apply.

b.
Paragraph 24d also applies, except that dogs 8 years of age or older will be evaluated to determine if the dog will be able to withstand the rigors of travel and have a projected useful life of 1 year or more.

Chapter .3 Training of Military Working Dog Teams
3-1. Training and retraining
a. Handlers.
(1)
Personnel selected for training and duty as MWD handlers are drawn from authorized MP career management field (MOS 95B) manpower resources. DOD civilian guards or police may also be used as Army dog handlers. The handler should be medically qualified in accordance with AR 40501. The handler will be a volunteer and should exhibit a high degree of affection for dogs. In addition, the handler should show qualities of:

(a)
Reasonable intelligence.

(b)
Resourcefulness.

(c)
Patience.

(d)
Dependability.

(e)
Reliability.

(2)
The MWD handler ASI may be awarded to MP personnel, having primary MOS 95B, only after formal training and certification at the 341st MWDTS, or at an equivalent (approved by HQDA(DAMOODLS) formal military or municipal Governmentsponsored course. If DOD civilian guards or police are used as Army dog handlers, they must attend the military training course at the 341st MWDTS or an equivalent (approved by DAMOODLS) formal military or municipal Governmentsponsored course.

(a)
All handlers must be certified by the 341st MWDTS or by an appointed certification authority.

(b)
Onthejobtraining (Off) for the purpose of qualifying military or civilian personnel as dog handlers is prohibited.

(c)
Formal standardized training ensures both minimum training standards and uniform performance of handler duties.

(d)
Awarded ASIs will be reported per AR 600200 to ensure proper assignment, utilization, and career management of MWD handlers.

(e)
Assignment stabilization of personnel trained from assigned MP assets is subject to policies as directed by Commander, PERSCOM.

(3)
There are two ASIs authorized for MWD handlers. The ASI, job title, and SGA based on AR 611201 are shown below.

(a)
Patrol Dog Handler; ASI A9; SGA E4.

5
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U
(b)
Patrol/Narcotics Detector Dog Handler and Patrol/Explosives Detector Dog Handler; ASI Z6; SGA E6. (4) Any person who voluntarily resigns, or is removed for cause from the MWD program before training is completed, is permanently barred from further dog handler courses. Cause for removal shall include, but not be limited to, any reasonable suspicion that the service member committed a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). Personnel with a dog handler ASI who are removed will have the dog handler ASI withdrawn.

(5)
Retention of any MWD handler ASI is based on active assignment to and participation in the MWD program. The MWD handler ASI will be withdrawn from any person who has not been assigned to and actively participated in the MWD program as a handler, dog trainer, handler trainer, or kennelmaster for more than 4 years.

b.
Kennelmasters. The kennelmaster is the noncommissioned officer in charge (NCOIC) of the MWD section and
exercises direct supervisory responsibility over the unit program. Military dog handlers will meet the following
minimum criteria to be appointed as a kennelmaster:

(1)
Be a qualified dog handler (ASI A9 and Z6) and have at least 2 years experience as patrol dog handler.

(2)
Be a graduate of the MWD Supervisor's Course taught at the 341st MWDTS, Lackland AFB, TX.

(3)
Be an SSG/E6 or above, according to the rank supervisory relationship specified below.

(a)
For kennelmaster of 5 or less dog handlers, an SSG/E6 is authorized.

(b)
For kennelmaster of 6 through 30 dog handlers, an SFC/E7 is authorized.

(c)
For kennelmaster of 31 or more dog handlers, an MSG/E8 is authorized.

(d)
For assistant kennelmaster to an MSG/E8 kennelmaster in a kennel authorized 31 or more dog handlers, an SFC/ E7 is authorized. One additional SFC/E7 is authorized for every 30 dog handlers over 60.

c. Certification authority.
(I)
A certification authority is a highly qualified kennelmaster and dog handler or trainer who has been appointed in writing by HQDA(DAMOODLS). The certification authority has specific knowledge and authority to certify and recertify dogs or handlers that have attained the level of proficiency necessary to be a qualified MWD or MWD handler. A certification authority also may decertify MWD teams that fail to meet proficiency standards. MWD handlers will meet the following minimum criteria to be appointed as a certification authority:

(a)
Be a qualified MWD handler (ASI P7 and Z6) with at least 2 years experience as a patrol dog handler and 2 years experience as a detector dog handler. The 2 years experience with both patrol and detector dogs may be concurrent when the MWD was a dualtrained dog.

(b)
Be a graduate of the MWD Supervisor's Course taught at the 341st MWDTS, Lackland AFB, TX.

(c)
Be a qualified kennelmaster with at least 2 years experience as a kennelmaster.

(d)
Be a qualified dog trainer or handler instructor with at least 2 years experience as an instructor with the 341st MWDTS.

(e)
Be an SSG/E6 or above.
(/) Be recommended at least through the first field grade officer command level.

(2)
Handlers or kennelmasters who meet the minimum criteria should submit application for appointment as a certification authority through their chain of command to DAMOODLS. It must describe the applicant's MWD Program experience, knowledge, and qualifications. A thorough justification statement, which includes compensating qualifications, must be included if a waiver for any of the listed criteria is being requested. Only a limited number of applicants will be appointed at any one time as necessitated by Army certification and recertification requirements for the period of appointment.

(3)
Applications will be updated and resubmitted annually to ensure the best qualified individuals can be selected.

(4)
Appointment as a certification authority will be for a specific period of time not to exceed 1 year. Authority may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of the HQDA(DAMOODLS).

(5)
DAMOODLS will be informed of all certification, recertification, or decertification actions by electronic message with TAPCEPLM and ATCOM (AMSTRMSFC) as recipients. As a minimum, the message will identify the type of action, handler involved (by name, rank, social security number, and unit of assignment), and MWD involved (by name, tattoo number, and whelp date). If the action is a decertification, a statement assessing the probability of

•ecertifying the team (after a "trainup" period) must be included.
d. Military working dogs.
(1)
The DOD has a continuing need for selected breed dogs. To qualify, dogs need not be purebred or registered. Large breed dogs should have the predominant features and characteristics of the Belgium Malinois and German Shepherd. Dogs should be between one and three years of age, at least 22 inches tall at the shoulder, and weigh at least 55 pounds. Because requirements are subject to change, inquiries regarding sale or donation of dogs to DOD, and inquiries concerning dog qualification and characteristics should be referred to the 341st MWDTS, Lackland AFB, TX 78236, ((512) 6714291 or toll free 18005311066). Only dogs procured by Army from the 341st MWDTS will be used in the MWD program.

(2)
All MWDs used by the Army will be initially trained at the 341st MWDTS. Local procurement or OJT of working dogs is prohibited.

(3)
A MWD will not be returned to the 341st MWDTS for retraining unless approved through the MACOM by

6U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004819
HQDA(DAMOODLS), and the 341st MWDTS per AR 70081. The 341st MWDTS will provide shipping instructions if the return is authorized.
3-2. Explosives detector dog team certification
The potential for loss of life or serious bodily injury in the explosives detection function is so great that certification of handler and dog as an explosives detection team is mandatory.
a.
EDDs and handlers (ASI Z6) will be trained and certified together as a team before being employed for explosives detection. Training and certification of new EDDs and/or new handlers will be conducted only at the 341st MWDTS.

b.
EDDs and EDD handlers who are already trained, but not as a team, will be certified as an explosives detection team before being employed for explosives detection. This will be accomplished by demonstrating minimum profi­ciency (95 percent or better detection rate) to an appointed certification authority.

c.
Certification of a dog with a handler is immediately nullified when the dog is assigned to any other handler.

3-3. Narcotic and contraband detector dog team certification
a.
Narcotics detector dogs are trained by the 341st MWDTS, Lackland Air Force Base, TX. The continuing effectiveness of narcotics detector dogs depends on continual reinforcement of the detection ability through proficiency training.

b.
Proficiency training is mandatory and a narcotics detector dog team should receive a minimum of 4 hours narcotics detection proficiency training each week.

(1)
The minimum standard of proficiency to maintain certification as a narcotics detector dog team is 90 percent or. better detection.

(2)
Failure to maintain an average proficiency that meets or exceeds the minimum proficiency standard for 3 or more consecutive months will result in automatic decertification of the narcotics detector dog team.

(3)
The team may be recertified only after retraining and consistent demonstration of the minimum standard of proficiency to an appointed certification authority.

3-4. Proficiency training of detector dogs
The effectiveness of dogs trained in narcotics, contraband, or explosives detection depends on continual reinforcement
of the detection ability through proficiency training. This training is mandatory. The minimum standard of proficiency
to maintain certification as a detection team is 90 percent or higher (with no more than a false response rate of 10
percent) for narcotics detector dogs, and 95 percent or higher (with no more than a false response rate of 10 percent)
for EDDs. Failure to maintain an average that meets or exceeds the minimum standard for 3 or more consecutive
months will result in automatic decertification of the MWD team. The team may be recertified only after retraining and
consistent demonstration to an appointed certification authority. Narcotics or contraband and explosives training aids
will be obtained, used, controlled, stored, accounted for, and secured by the using unit, installation, or activity per the
requirements of this regulation and the instructions in DA Pam 19012.
3-5. Narcotics and contraband training aids
a. Units, installations, and activities located within the States or territories of the United States will apply to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration.
(1)
The DEA will issue a. registration certificate to authorized applicants.

(2)
Registration is valid for 1 year and must be renewed annually.

(3)
Possession or use of narcotics training aids by units not registered with the DEA is prohibited.

(4)
Registration and procurement instructions are provided in DA Pam 19012.

b.
Overseas units will not register with the DEA. Procurement and use of narcotics or contraband training aids in overseas areas will be coordinated with appropriate host governments. Overseas MACOM commanders will establish procedures for procuring and using narcotics or contraband training aids consistent with the requirements of this regulation, AR 1955,and DA Pam 19012.

c.
Units, installations, and activities which have been authorized to procure and use narcotics or contraband training aids (DEA registration or appropriate overseas command approval) are authorized to procure up to 200 grams of marihuana, 20 grams of hashish, 20 grams of heroin, and 20 grams of cocaine. The maximum quantities of controlled substances authorized to be stored at any one time is 300 grams of marihuana, 30 grams of hashish, 30 grams of heroin, and 30 grams of cocaine (DA Pam 19012). Reasonable quantity limits will be established for other controlled substances (for example, amphetamines, barbiturates, and so forth) when these are available and are used for training. All narcotics or contraband training aids will be accounted for on DA Form 4608R (Controlled Substances Accounta­bility Record). DA Form 4607R (Controlled Substance Training Aid Utilization Record) will be used to account for issue and tumin of narcotics or contraband training aids. Their use and relationship to other forms can be found in DA Pam 19012. Blank copies and instructions for use of DA Form 4607R and DA Form 4608R are located at the back of this handbook. These forms can be locally reproduced on 8 1/2 by 1 linch paper.

7
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U
d.
Synthetic drugs (for example, pseudoheroin or pseudococaine) will not be used for training of narcotics or contraband detector dogs.

e.
Any theft of narcotics or contraband training aids, or any loss of 1 gram or more of heroin or cocaine, or 2 grams or more of marihuana, will be reported immediately by serious incident report (SIR) (AR 19040). Thefts or losses will be investigated and results of the investigation will be reported by addon SIR. The incident will also be reported to the appropriate office of the DEA. (See DA Pam 19012 for the listing of DEA offices.)

f Commanders or provost marshals/security officers will appoint, in writing, a custodian and an alternate custodian. Before being appointed, the custodian and alternate custodian will be cleared by a favorable US Army Crime Records Center name check before being appointed. The custodian and alternate custodian will be responsible for the procure­ment, storage, security, accountability, and control of narcotics or contraband training aids per this regulation and the instructions in DA Pam 19012. Further, all MP personnel authorized to use the narcotics or contraband training aids will be designated in writing.
g. Commanders or provost marshals/security officers will appoint, in writing, a explosives training aid custodian and an alternate custodian. Before being appointed, the custodian and alternate custodian will be cleared by a favorable
U.S.
Army Crime Records Center name check. The custodian and alternate custodian will be responsible for the procurement, storage, security, accountability, and control of explosives training aids per this regulation and the instructions in DP Pam 19012.

h.
Checks for the accountability of all explosives training aids will be conducted monthly by a disinterested person (in grade of E7 or above). See DA Pam 19012 for accountability instructions.

3-6. Explosives training aids
a.
All personnel associated with EDD training will be trained by explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) or safety personnel in the safe storage, transportation, and handling of each type of explosive used as training aids before conducting or participating in this proficiency training.

b.
Commanders will ensure safety training for using explosives training aids is available before seeking authoriza­tions for EDDs and handlers.

c.
Canine Explosive Scent Kits (CESK) can be requisitioned through local supply channels (NSN 1375011927411). •

(1)
Explosives should be packaged by type required, and in the sizes needed.

(2)
Training aids by types of explosives are given a federal stock number and issued through the munitions supply systems.

(3)
Training aids can be centrally procured and distributed.

(4)
The central procurement agency can either buy the explosives properly packaged, or package them before distribution to units.

d.
The types and quantities of explosives authorized for use in training are specified in DA Pam 19012. MACOM commanders, with HQDA (DAMOODLS) concurrence, may authorize additional explosives training aids when the use of other explosives substances is identified and such use merits development of a detection capability.

e.
Explosives training aids will be issued only to those persons who have received the explosives safety it -lining prescribed in a, above. All personnel who are authorized to handle explosives training aids will be designated, in writing, by the activity or installation provost marshal, security officer, or MP unit commander after successful completion of training conducted by EOD personnel.

f Explosives training aids will be transported only in Government vehicles which have been certified as safe for explosives transportation by explosives safety personnel.
3-7. Training assistance team(s)
a. Commanders may encounter a training problem that is beyond the scope of the command's ability to resolve. Commanders may request training assistance through the appropriate MACOM to DAMOODLS. The request will
(1)
Describe the problem.

(2)
Describe the measures which have been taken to resolve the problem.

(3)
Contain a thorough justification of the need for training assistance, and verification that the requesting command will provide TDY funding for the training assistance team and pay for all training costs.

b.
MACOM commanders will review all training assistance requests from subordinate commands. Whenever possible, the training assistance requested will be provided from MACOM resources. When the requested training assistance exceeds the resources of the MACOM, the MACOM review and endorsement of the training assistance request will further:

(1)
Define or clarify the problem.

(2)
Describe the measures taken by the MACOM to resolve the problem.

(3)
Certify that training assistance team TDY funding and training costs will be provided.

c.
The HQDA (DAMOODLS) will review all training assistance requests forwarded to the MACOMs. Approved

8U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
training assistance requests will be forwarded to the Commander, TRADOC. The Commander, TRADOC will consti­tute a training assistance team qualified by training and experience to resolve the training problem, and will provide the requested training assistance at the requesting command's expense.
Chapter 4 Utilization of Military Working Dog Teams
4-1. General utilization requirements
a.
MWDs provide valuable assistance to MP and physical security personnel. The dog's senses of smell and hearing greatly enhance a detection capability. Dogs trained to search and patrol greatly increase the capability to locate and capture an elusive suspect. The dog can prevent an intruder or criminal suspect from escaping. When necessary, the dog's ability to deliver a bite of pressure provides an added dimension of physical force as an alternative to the use of deadly force. Public knowledge of the MWD team's capabilities provide MP and security forces with a formidable deterrent whenever and wherever the MWD team is employed.

b.
MWDs will always be employed with an appropriately trained and qualified handler. At no time will the handler leave the dog unattended during employment, including rest periods.

c.
Each MWD will have only one assigned handler so that the dog will maintain an aggressive attitude toward all other persons. A handler may be assigned to more than one dog; however, a dog will never be assigned to more than one handler.

d.
Commanders of installations where MWD teams are used should consult with their Staff Judge Advocate to determine legal requirements for, and local restrictions on, using MWDs.

e.
Visits to MWD kennels or training areas by other than the assigned handler and maintenance personnel in the performance of their official duties will be limited so as to avoid unduly exciting the dogs. Visits without official purpose will be prohibited.

f The psychological deterrent value of MWD teams can be increased by conducting periodic public demonstrations. Demonstrations should be as realistic as possible, commensurate with safety, and should include all phases of the dog's training, including drug and explosives detection. Publicity for these demonstrations helps to increase attendance to gain full deterrent benefit. Information on the methods of confusing or limiting the MWD's effectiveness will not be revealed. Demonstrations, although beneficial, will be limited to those considered particularly advantageous to the goal of deterrence. This precludes the inference that the dog is a "show" animal, rather than a working law enforcement and security tool.
g.
Temporary duty and permanent change of station (PCS) travel orders involving movement of an MWD team will include instructions that authorize use of civilian veterinary facilities and services at Government expense, if military veterinary facilities and services are not available. Handlers will carry the MWD's medical records. When the TDY period exceeds 30 days, the MWD will be accompanied by a health certificate prepared and signed by a veterinarian no more than 10 days prior to embarkation. If the TDY location is in a different Army veterinarian area of operation, the gaining veterinarian will be notified prior to departure from the home station.

h.
The supplementary crime codes specified in AR 19045 will be entered on MP reports of incidents which have involved the use of MWD teams. There are separate codes for each type of dog team, as well as separate codes for detection of marihuana, hashish, heroin, and cocaine.

i.
Dog handlers will not be assigned additional duties that interfere with their dog handler responsibilities. This stipulation is not meant to prohibit training activities such as field training exercises, required unit training, or physical training (PT).

4-2. Use of force
a.
Policies regarding the use of force are set forth in AR 19014. Use of MWDs as a measure of force will be in accord with the provisions of this regulation. The release of an MWD to apprehend a person suspected of committing a serious offense is the minimum force necessary when the alternative is escape or the use of deadly force as defined in AR 19014. An MWD should not be released if a lesser measure of force would accomplish the apprehension.

b.
Release of a patrol dog to apprehend a suspect is a greater measure of force than use of an MP club, but less than deadly force because a patrol dog is trained to terminate an attack on voice command of its handler.

c.
A challenge or order to halt will be given before an MWD is released to attack. Dog handlers are not normally equipped with an MP club, and because of the requirement to control their dog, normally will not be able to employ any unarmed defense techniques. Therefore, a warning to the suspect about the possibility of an attack by the MWD (in selfdefense, in defense of the dog handler, or on order of the handler) should be announced as soon as possible in any

encounter.
d. Commanders and provost marshals/security offices using MWDs will establish clear policies and procedures governing the release of dogs per this regulation and AR 19014. Commanders will ensure that all affected personnel
9
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U
are thoroughly familiar with these policies and procedures. Policies and procedures developed by commanders should fully recognize the potential danger of bodily injury to a suspect if an MWD is released. Nothing in this regulation should be interpreted to preclude making all reasonable efforts to use all lesser means of force.
e. MWD teams will not be used for crowd control or direct confrontation with demonstrators unless determined to be absolutely necessary by the responsible commander. When it is necessary, dogs will be kept on a short leash to minimize the danger to innocent persons. Dogs will not be released into a crowd. Civil disturbance contingency plans will include specific criteria for use of MWD teams that are consistent with this regulation, AR 19014, and DA Pam 19012.
4-3. Potential of military working dogs
a.
The MWD is a largely untapped resource for use in the MP combat support role. The MWD is trained in many skills which can make a difference between the success or failure of many combat missions.

b.
The MWD may be trained for scouting, patrolling, building search, and tracking. All of these skills contribute to battlefield circulation control and area security operations. In a conventional war environment, MPs play a major role in combating threats during rear area combat operation missions. Therefore, the ability of the MWD to detect an ambush, to find explosives placed by saboteurs, or to track a raiding party will be critical to success.

c.
The use of MWD teams to increase MP combat potential and to enhance MP response shortages is limited only by a lack of initiative, imagination, and training of units on how to employ MWDs. To ensure combat readiness, MWD teams will participate in field training and deployment exercises. Some examples of potential employment are as follows:

(I)
Perimeter patrol.

(2)
Main supply route patrol.

(3)
Security of designated personnel, units, or facilities.

(4)
Point security (for example, circulation control point or traffic control point).

(5)
Enemy prisoner of war control.

(6)
Security of special weapons.

(7)
Mine and tunnel detection.

(8)
Area reconnaissance and ambush detection.

4-4. Patrol dogs
Patrol dogs may be used in all security and MP operations. Patrol dog utilization enhances the commander's ability to protect installation facilities and resources, prevent crime, and provide law enforcement services. Patrol dog training prepares the dogs to work well in isolated or remote areas, as well as among people, with complete safety and effectiveness. To fully utilize the patrol dog's potential, commanders should consider the following:
a.
Patrol dogs should be employed in all areas of the installation. Patrol dogs should be used during both day and night. Public visibility increases the patrol dog team's ability to deter theft, burglary, and vandalism.

b.
The patrol dog's superior detection ability is especially useful at night or during periods of limited visibility. Patrol dogs can detect a fleeing person that a human could not detect and, if necessary, pursue, attack, and hold the fleeing person where the handler has probable cause to believe that a serious offense has been committed. Except in extraordinary circumstances, apprehensions for minor offenses will be accomplished without releasing the dog.

c.
Patrol dogs and their handlers can present a strong crime deterrent or detection capability when used in parking lots, around billets and housing areas, and to make building security checks when used as walking patrols. Around schools, patrol dogs can be used to deter vandals, child molesters, exhibitionists, and illegal drug activities. Patrol dogs can also provide enhanced security for communications facilities and command posts.

d.
When patrol dogs and handlers are used to form mobile patrols, the handler can work safely with or without a partner. Mobility significantly increases the patrol dog team's potential of coverage and makes it possible for the team to perform more functions during a duty shift. The dog will ride with the handler inside the vehicle while the vehicle is in operation. Some minor vehicle modification is necessary to provide the dog with a stable platform over the passenger seat. The platform allows the patrol dog to see and to be seen and to be able to react to any situation in which the handler is threatened or needs the patrol dog. Mobile patrols are most effective when employing the ride awhilewalk awhile method. Mobile patrols provide an increased security .and enforcement potential for alarm re-sponses, funds escorts, group confrontations, and security of distinguished visitors. Every effort will be made to preclude using pickup trucks for patrol vehicles. Pickup trucks will be used only as a last resort.

e.
Patrol dog handlers will be armed with a pistol or revolver. Sling carried weapons, such as rifles or shotguns, may still be appropriate for certain security posts, even though they hamper the movement of the handler and increase the difficulty of controlling the dog.

4-5. Narcotics/contraband detector dogs
Narcotics/contraband detector dogs are trained to detect concealed marihuana, hashish, heroin, and cocaine. Detector dogs will not be trained on drug substances (such as, phencyclidine (PCP)) that present a health and safety threat to the
10U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004823
dog without expressed, written approval in advance by DAMOODLS. All requests to authorize such training will be submitted through the appropriate MACOM to DAMOODLS. Such approvals will be granted only in limited, casebycase situations, and are not encouraged. Narcotics detector dogs will not be trained to detect any explosives. The following principles will be followed when using narcotics detector dog teams:
a.
Criminal investigators and/or MP investigators will assist the narcotics or contraband detector dog team, when­ever appropriate. Obtaining search authorization and collecting evidence are examples of functions with which investigators can assist. Investigators and other MP personnel should work with the detector team as frequently as possible to become familiar with the dog's response and allow the dog to become accustomed to them. However, only the handler will determine when the dog has responded.

b.
Handlers will be briefed regularly on the scope of the drug abuse problem. They will be trained to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the law of search and seizure, search techniques, and the legal procedural requirements for custody of evidence or contraband in addition to their normal MP training.

c.
Narcotics detector dogs can be used to conduct inspections in accordance with the Military Rule of Evidence 313. While detection dogs may be used to sniff the air surrounding a person, dogs will not be used to inspect (search) an individual's person for the purpose of determining the exact location of concealed contraband.

d.
Small breed narcotics/contraband detector dogs (beagles and cairn terriers) have been used by the Army to enhance the capability to detect narcotics or contraband concealed in areas not accessible to the larger dogs.

e.
Primarily due to lack of wartime mission, both the small breed and large breed narcotic/contraband detector dogs are being phased out by attrition. They are being replaced by the patrol/narcotic detector dog.

4-6. Explosives detector dogs
One of the most effective countermeasures to the increasing use of explosives by terrorists and criminals is the deterrent value and the detection capability of the EDD team. Explosives detection is a critical function in protecting life and property, and only the most qualified patrol dogs and handlers should be selected for this training and mission. The EDD team is required to pass rigid certification standards, as a team, before being employed for explosives detection.
a. Personnel selected for EDD handler training must be:
(1)
Qualified as a patrol dog handler.

(2)
Must be a volunteer for explosives detection training.

(3)
Must have demonstrated outstanding motivation, maturity, judgment, and integrity.

b.
Patrol dogs utilized for explosives detection training must demonstrate exceptional skills in detecting, tracking, and building search. The 341st MWDTS uses a special screening process to select patrol dogs for explosives detection training. Proficiency in patrol dog skills must be maintained to ensure that the dog retains its energy and inquisitiveness which are skills critical to the dogs explosives detection capability.

c.
A new EDD and/or new handler must graduate from the same training course and be certified as a team. Whenever a separately trained handler and dog are joined to become an explosives detection team, the handler and the dog must be certified at the 341st MWDTS (or when approved by Chief, DAMOODLS, by an appointed certification authority) as a team before the team can be employed for explosives detection.

d.
EDDs will not be trained to detect any drugs, narcotics, or other contraband substances that are not explosives. Training to detect explosive substances other than those the dog was trained to detect at the 341st MWDTS must be approved in advance by HQDA(DAMOODLS). An official request for such additional training will be submitted through command channels.

e.
EDDs may be used for inspections in the same manner described for narcotics detector dogs in paragraph 45c.

4-7. Explosives detector dog team assistance to civil authorities
a.
The Department of the Army is not required to provide the services of Army EDD teams to assist nonDOD or civil agencies. However, installation commanders may honor requests for assistance from Federal agencies or civil authorities for such services upon determination that such assistance is required in the interest of public safety.

b.
DOD Directive 3025.12 authorizes installation commanders to provide EOD service in support of civil authori­ties. The explosives detection capability provided by trained EDD teams is considered to be an aspect of EOD as defined in AR 7515.

c.
Installation commanders will adhere to the following guidelines in responding to nonDOD requests for assistance for EDD teams:

(I) Requests for assistance should be from civilian governmental, police, fire, or disaster officials. Dog team
services will not be provided to private concerns or individuals unless requested by Federal agencies or civil authorities.
(2) Requesting agencies (Federal agencies excepted) or civil authorities must agree, as a condition for the perform­ance of EDD team services, to the provisions outlined in DD Form 1926 (Explosive Ordnance Disposal Civil Support Release and Reimbursement Agreement). The DD Form 1926 may be executed for a period of time, not to exceed 1 year, for a defined geographical area or jurisdiction, or prior to providing EDD team service in response to a request
11
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U
for assistance. In emergency situations, the form may be executed after the provision of dog team services if the requesting official is informed of the responsibilities and liabilities contained therein and agrees verbally.
(3)
Only certified EDD teams will be used.

(4)
Army requirements for detector dog teams will have priority for their employment, followed by other Federal agencies and civil authorities, in that order.

(5)
The EDD handler will not be separated from his dog under any circumstances when providing service to Federal or civil authorities. The handler must have exclusive control of his search effort and complete access to the search area.

(6)
When providing assistance to Federal or civil authorities, EDD handlers will be unarmed and will not wear any distinguishing MP accessories (badge, brassard, lanyard, handcuffs, MP club, distinctive web/leather gear, and so forth). Handlers will perform the sole task of working their dogs and will not participate in any other activity to assist civil authorities.

(7)
Only the dog team's searching and detecting capabilities will be utilized when providing assistance to civil authorities. Use of the dog team to track and search a building or area for, and/or detect, pursue, and hold, an intruder or offender suspect is prohibited.

(8)
Representatives of the requesting agency with appropriate authority will accompany the EDD team at all times when it is working. Should the EDD respond, the handler will so advise the accompanying representative and withdraw or continue the search pattern, as appropriate.

(9)
Requesting agencies will be advised that the Army cannot accept responsibility for establishing or maintaining a chain of custody for possible use in court, nor engage in other activities to enforce the law in connection with this service.

4-8. Using military EDD assets for VIP missions
a.
The USAF has been designated to serve as the primary service point of contact for all VIP missions received from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), US Secret Service (USSS), or Department of State (DOS). All mission taskings should be issued by the VIP coordination officer who, under authority from the Secretary of Defense, shall task and coordinate all missions performed by DOD EDD team personnel, regardless of service affiliation.

b.
The primary consideration in the service tasking process will be the use of the "closest available unit" concept which has proven cost effective and operationally efficient.

c.
The length of each mission can vary from a few hours to several days.

d.
USSS support missions require participating personnel to display a high degree of discretion in their personal appearance. A clothing allowance will be provided to purchase appropriate attire based on the mission and climate so that EDD team personnel may blend in. Clothing may consist of:

(1)
A number of conservative business suits (preferably dark in color).

(2)
Casual clothing may be required in a number of situations such as golfing events and other less formal functions.

c.
EDD team credentials, pins, and vehicle placards. Each MACOM shall develop and implement a comprehensive distribution and accountability system for all DOD EDD team credentials. The credentials will be controlled by HQDA (DAMOODLS). The USSS and DOS personnel will issue identification, pins, and vehicle placards upon arrival at the mission site.

Chapter 5 Kennel Facilities and Care of Dogs
5-1. Kennel facilities
a.
Standards for construction and operations of kennel facilities will be according to DA Pam 19012. New construction must be coordinated with supporting veterinary activity and the COE.

b.
Kennel facilities will not be used to house or care for any animals other than MWDs.

5-2. Warning signs
a. To gain the maximum psychological advantage of MWDs and to protect the innocent or unwary trespasser, signs bearing the following words will be installed at installation entrances and on primary access roads to installations where MWDs are used. CAUTION THIS AREA PATROLLED BY MILITARY WORKING DOGS In areas outside the continental United States (CONUS), Hawaii, and Alaska, these signs should use English and any language(s) of the host nation which would be appropriate or may be required by mutual agreement.
12U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
b.
Warning signs will be posted on the exterior fencing and buildings of the MWD kennel and exercise area. Signs should contain the following words: "DANGER OFF LIMITS MILITARY DOG AREA."

c.
Personnel approaching the installation or the kennel area should be able to see and read the warning signs under normal daylight conditions from a distance of 50 meters.

d.
A warning sign stating "DANGER MILITARY WORKING DOG DO NOT TAMPER WITH ANIMAL," will be attached to all shipping crates used for MWDs. In addition, shipping crates must be labeled on the top and one or more sides with the words "LIVE ANIMAL."

e.
Removable warning signs stating "CAUTION MILITARY WORKING DOGS" will be placed on the sides (and rear, when appropriate) of any vehicle used to transport MWDs.

f Personnel approaching a vehicle or shipping crate being used to transport an MWD should be able to see and read the warning signs under normal daylight conditions from a distance of 10 meters. See and read the warning signs under normal daylight conditions from a distance of 10 meters.
g. AR 38530 describes standard design for these signs and is the authority for their construction and replacement.
5-3. Care and grooming
The dog handler is trained to care for an MWD. The handler is responsible for the dog's daily care and grooming, of the daily cleaning of the dog kennel and run, and feeding of the dog as prescribed by the attending veterinarian and DA Pam 19012.
5-4. Feeding requirements
a.
Standard dog food available for requisition includes: feed, high caloric, medicated, NSN 8710004034565 medi­cated maximum stress diet (MSD); feed, high caloric, nonmedicated, NSN 8710001446834; dog food, dry, NSN 8710002688203; and dog food, canned, NSN 8710002688205.

b.
Special diets may be procured and fed to individual dogs when the veterinarian determines that other than the standard diet is required.

c.
Nutritional standards for an MWD are contained in AR 40654.

5-5. Veterinary care
a.
All MWDs should be seen by an Army veterinarian (or civilian veterinarian if an emergency or authorized by attending Army veterinarian), whenever any signs of illness or injury are detected by the handler or the kennelmaster. This includes any change in hearing or elimination habits, behavior, or other more obvious signs of illness or injury.

b.
The kennelmaster should coordinate with the veterinarian for the routine, semiannual examination of all MWDs (AR 40905).

Chapter 6 Administration
6-1. Inspections
a.
Provost marshals will conduct a monthly inspection of handlers, dogs, training, team utilization, team proficiency, equipment, and kennel facilities. Provost marshals will inspect for compliance with this regulation. DA Pam 19012 contains guidelines that will be helpful in this inspection.

b.
Although the focus of the inspection may vary from month to month, all aspects of the MWD program should be closely inspected at least quarterly. A written record of the provost marshal's monthly inspection will be prepared and corrective action identified. Subsequent inspections will ensure that corrective action has been taken. The written record of the provost marshal's inspections will be maintained for at least 1 year after the date of the inspection. Commander should conduct a 6month post certification inspection.

c.
The attending Veterinary Corps officer will conduct a sanitary inspection of each MWD facility at least quarterly to ensure compliance with health and welfare requirements of AR 40905 and other regulatory guidance. A copy of the inspection report will be provided to the MWD accountable officer.

6-2. Records
a.
When a dog is procured, a permanent administrative record file is initiated by the 341st MWDTS, along with a permanent veterinary health record. Together, the administrative record and the health record constitute the permanent record file.

b.
The record file will accompany the dog on every transfer and will be kept current by the organization to which the dog is assigned.

c.
Upon the death of the dog, the dog's permanent record file will be forwarded to Military Dog Records, Lackland, AFB, Texas 78236. AR 70081 contains additional instructions.

13
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 U
d. The following administrative records will be maintained. Detailed instructions are provided in appendix B for completing the listed DA forms. A copy of each DA form is located at the back of this handbook and may be locally reproduced on 8 1/2 by 11 inch paper. (See DA Pam 19012 for detailed information on training and utilization requirements.)
(1)
DD Form 1834 (Military Working Dog Service Record). (This form is completed and issued by the 341st MWDTS with initial assignment of the dog after training.)

(2)
DA Form 2807R (Military Working Dog Training and Utilization Record).

(3)
DA Form 3992R (Narcotics or Explosives Detector Dog Training and Utilization Record).

(4)
DA Form 4607R (Controlled Substance Training Aid Utilization Record).

(5)
DA Form 4608R (Controlled Substances Accountability Record).

e.
Descriptions of medical records used for MWDs are contained in AR 40905. Only veterinarian personnel are authorized to make or direct entries in an MWDs medical record. Medical records may be kept at the office of the attending veterinarian, or at the kennel facility with the administrative records, as specified by the attending Army

veterinarian.
6-3. Accountability of military working dogs
MWDs will be placed on the unit property boot. by NSN, name, whelp date, and tattoo number, and handreceipted to the kennelmaster per provisions of DA Pam 71021. When the MWD team is transferred, handler orders will include the NSN, name, and tattoo number of the dog. DA Form 3161 (Request for Issue or Turnin) will be used for the lateral transfer of the MWD to the gaining commander per DA Pam 71021.
6-4. Shipping crates
a.
All dogs will be transported in standard aluminum shipping crates (NSN 8115008033172) or suitable substitute (airline approved) plastic style shipping crates. The shipping crate and other equipment will be transferred with the dog when the dog or the MWD team is reassigned.

b.
Army procured crates will be stenciled with "US Army" and a serial number identical to the dog's tattoo number. Units are authorized one crate per dog on hani. Army shipping crates will be placed on the unit property book by NSN and serial number and handreceipted to the kennelmaster per the provisions of DA Pam 71021, chapters 4 and 5. DA Form 3161 will be used to accomplish the lateral transfer of the crate from one unit to another. Shipping crates for dogs which have died will be retained for use with the replacement dog. The replacement dog will have a new tattoo number so the crate should be restenciled with the new number and the unit property book corrected.

c.
MWDs received from the 341st MWDTS normally will be shipped in Air Force shipping crates. These shipping crates are the property of the 341st MWDTS and are not included with the procurement of the dog. Air Force crates received or borrowed from the 341st MWDTS will be returned to the 341st MWDTS within 10 days after the shipment. The Commander, ATCOM, will notify MACOMs of changes to this procedure. (For example, plans are being made to charge the cost of a shipping crate to the procurement price of the dog. Then, the crate will be Army property and treated as such upon receipt.)

14U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
Appendix A References
Section I Required Publications
AR 190-14
Carrying of Firearms and Use of Force for Law Enforcement and Security Duties. (Cited in para 42.)
AR 190-40
Serious Incident Report. (Cited in para 35.)
AR 190-45
Military Police Law Enforcement Reporting Subscription. (Cited in para 41.)
AR 195-5
Evidence Procedures. (Cited in para 35.)
AR 310-34
Equipment Authorization and Utilization Policies and Criteria, and Common Tables of Allowances. (Cited in para 21.)
AR 310-49
The Army Authorization Documents System (TAADS) Documentation Procedures and Processing. (Cited in paras 14,
21 .)
AFR 400-8/AR 700-81/0MAVINST 10570.1/MCO 10570.1
DOD Dog Program. (Cited in paras 11, 14, 23, 31, and 62.)
DA Pam 190-12
Military Working Dog Program. (Cited in paras 11, 14, 21, 22, 24, 34, 35, 36, 42, 51, 53, 61, 62, and app B.)
DA Pam 710-2-1
Using Unit Supply System (Manual Procedures). (Cited in paras 63 and 64.)
Section II Related Publications
AR 40-3
Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care
AR 40-501
Standards of Medical Fitness
AR 40-605
Review Procedures for High Cost Medical Equipment
AR 40-654
Veterinary Services Nutritional Standards for Military Working Dogs
AR 40-905
Veterinary Health Services
AR 75-15
Responsibilities and Procedures for Explosive Ordnance Disposal
AR 190-22
Searches, Seizures, and Disposition of Property
AR 210-10
Administration
15
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 U
AR 385-30
Safety Color Code Markings and Signs
AR 600-200
Army Command Policy
AR 611-201
Enlisted Career Management Fields and Military Occupational Specialties
DODD 3025.12
Employment of Military Resources in the Event of Civil Disturbances
DODD 5200.31
Single Manager for DOD Military Working Dog Program
FM 19-10
The Military Police Law and Order Operations
FM 19-30
Physical Security
Section III
Prescribed Forms
Exact duplicate of any DA or DD forms generated by the automated Military Police Management Information System may be used in place of the official printed version of the form. Forms that have been designated "approved for electronic generation (EG)" must replicate exactly the content (wording), format (layout), and sequence (arrangement) of the official printed form. The form number of the electronicallygenerated form will be the same as the date of the current edition of the printed form.
DA Form 2807—R
Military Working Dog Training and Utilization Record. (Prescribed in para 62.)
DA Form 3992—R
Narcotics or Explosives Detector Dog Training and Utilization Record. (Prescribed in para 62.)
DA Form 4607—R
Controlled Substance Training Aid Utilization Record. (Prescribed in paras 35 and 62.)
DA Form 4608—R
Controlled Substances Accountability Record. (Prescribed in paras 35 and 62.)
Section IV
Referenced Forms

DA Form 3161
Request for Issue or Turnin.
"DD Form 1834
Military Working Dog Service Record.
DD Form 1926
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Civil Support Release and Reimbursement Agreement.
DEA Form 222
DEA Official Order Form for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances.
16U AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DEA Form 223
Controlled Substances Registration Certificate.
Appendix B Forms
Section I Instructions for Completing DA Form 2807R
B-1. DA Form 2807R
a. Training. This section of the form provides complete training information on all of the training tasks which must be accomplished for a patrol dog to maintain proficiency. It is not necessary to train on all of the controlled aggression tasks during the same day.
(1)
Lines 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10 list required training tasks. Entries may be made in minutes or hours for the amount of time spent training on specific tasks during a particular day of the month. However, the monthly total for each specific task will be in hours and entered in the far right hand column titled "Total Hours."

(2)
Line 4 is an evaluation of that day's training on controlled aggression tasks stating whether the dog's perform­ance was satisfactory or unsatisfactory. An "S" will be used for satisfactory performance and a "U" will be used for unsatisfactory performance. All unsatisfactory performance annotations will have an explanation for the deficiency and corrective action taken recorded on the reverse side of the form and continuation sheets, if necessary. The entries on lines 4a through 4e are the amount of time spent training on each of the controlled aggression tasks.

(3)
Line 8 is to be used for the amount of time spent conducting scout or patrol training. Lines 8a through 8c are used to record the distance between the MWD team and the decoy being detected. The method of making time entries will be the same as that outlined in (a) above.

(4)
Handler or trainer evaluation of the dog's daily training rating will be entered on line 11 of the Training section. An "S" will be used for satisfactory performance and a "U" will be used for unsatisfactory performance.

b.
Utilization. The utilization section provides a daily record of the time spent performing MP duties in the three general categories of combat support operations, law enforcement patrol, and security patrol.

(1)
The combat support operations category may be used to record time spent performing MP missions, actual or training, in support of combat units. Such operations include field training exercises, command post exercises, mobilization exercises, and other activities related to the tactical and strategic missions of the Army.

(2)
Entries on line 4 provide a daily rating of the performance of the MWD while performing MP duties. ("S" is for satisfactory, "U" is for unsatisfactory.) All unsatisfactory performance annotations will have an explanation for the deficiency and corrective action taken recorded on the reverse side of the form and continuation sheets, if necessary.

(3)
When training is conducted during the period of time reported as utilization, the amount of time spent training may also be reported in the training section. However, when time is "doublecounted" a notation should be made on the reverse of the form explaining the doubletime entry. In this way, it will be possible to differentiate between training time, training time while on duty, and duty (utilization) time.

(4)
The total monthly utilization hours are recorded in the last column titled "Total Hours."

c.
Daily feeding. This section makes it possible to record the quantity of food fed daily to the dog for as many as two feedings each day.

(1)
The type of food being used should be recorded in the first column on line 1.

(2)
If the second daily feeding is a different type of food, or if the veterinarian changes the diet of the dog during the month, the second or new type of food is recorded on line 2. Line 2 may also be used to indicate the type and amount of food used daily for dogs on a food reward system.

(3)
The last column, titled "Wt of Dog," is used to record a semi-monthly weight for the dog. The weight checks need not always occur on the middle and last day of each month, but should occur on approximately the same days each month. There is sufficient room under the headings "Date" and "Lbs" to record both the date when the dog is weighed and the weight in pounds.

Section II Instruction for Completing DA Form 3992R
B-3. DA Form 3992R
a. Training. This section of the form is used for recording all training of the detector dog team in the detection skill. Three of the most common detection areas, buildings, containers, and vehicles, are listed, with one blank space for detection training in other areas. Examples of other areas may include mail inspection, search of open areas, noncontact search of persons, inspection of luggage, inspection of household goods and hold baggage, or any other areas
17
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 U
considered significant or unique to the command to which the dog team is assigned. Although some of the examples may be included under one of the three prelisted categories, these (or others) may be listed separately. Additional forms may be used when there is a necessity to conduct more than four types of detection training. The preprinted categories on additional forms may be crossed through and all four blocks used.
(1)
The top block of each training category is divided into two blocks. The top block is used to record the number of training aids planted for that day's detection training. The bottom block is used to record the number of training aids found by the detector dog by a proper response.

(2)
Search time is the total amount of time devoted to detection training in each training category for that day. Detection training is the start time to the finish time of each training problem.

(3)
The monthly totals in the last column titled "Total Hours" are obtained by adding the daily time entries in each training category and entering the result.

b.
Utilization. All operational detection missions are recorded in the utilization section. As in the training section, three of the most common detection tasks are already listed. However, any detection missions that are significant should be listed separately to give an accurate record of the types of detection missions for which the detector dog team is used. Additional forms may be used whenever there are more than four types of significant detection missions being performed by the team. When additional forms are used, all four blocks may be used simply by crossing through the preprinted categories and entering the appropriate additional categories. There are two blocks under each date for each utilization category.

(1)
The top block is for recording the number of times a substance is found that the dog has been trained to detect.

(2)
The bottom block is for recording the total search or inspection time for the detection mission.

(3)
The last column is the sum of the daily times and gives a record of the total amount of time spent performing the detection missions for that month.

(4)
If desired, the number of finds for the month can also be totaled and entered in the last column.

c.
Detector dog search data. This section is used by the handler to record all relevant information about the productivity and success of each detection mission. •

(1)
The Time and Date entries are selfexplanatory. They provide a quick reference for when the detector dog team has performed detection missions.

(2)
The Location may be a building number, a unit designation, map grid coordinates, and/or any other information that helps to identify where the detection mission was performed.

(3)
MPR Number is the military police report number assigned to the case to account for the custody and disposition of the substances found.

(4)
The Substance is the identification of the material found by a common name, such as heroin, marihuana, dynamite, or detonating cord.

(5)
Quantity is a measure of the amount of the substance found. Weight, volume, overall dimensions, length, or any other appropriate measure may be used.

(6)
The Remarks section may be used for adding any other relevant information about the substance found. This would include field or laboratory verification of the type of substan6e, EOD evaluation of an explosive device or explosive substance as live or inert, or the presence of other hazardous material in or around the substance found, such as razor blades, trip wires, or poisons. Record any information which may be useful in preparing the team for fUture searches or which may be applicable or useful to other detector dog teams. Use addon sheets if needed. The greater the amount of information shared among detector dog handlers, the more successful the detector dog program will become.

d.
Detector dog proficiency. A correct response occurs when the dog detects the substance, responds with a proper response, and the training aid is found where the dog has responded. A false response is when the dog responds as if it has detected the substance (the training aid), but no training aid can be found where the dog has responded. A missed response is when the dog fails to detect and respond with a proper response to the presence of a training aid.

(1)
The detector dog's proficiency is computed monthly by adding the total number of correct responses, "a" for the month, and adding the total number of false/missed responses, "b," for the month. These two numbers "a" (for total correct responses) and "b" (for total false/missed responses) are used in the following formula to obtain the detector dog's proficiency rating: (a b 100) proficiency rating For example, during the month the detector dog made 93 correct responses on training aids. The dog also had 4 false and 3 missed responses for a total of 7 false/missed responses. Applying these two numbers (a93 and b7) to the formula, the following is obtained:

(93)
(93 7) or (93) (100 100) 93 percent

(2)
The computation in a above shows the dog is working at a 93 percent proficiency rate. This rate is above the minimum standard of a narcotics detector dog (90 percent), but below the minimum standard for an EDD (95 percent). The narcotics detector dog handler should continue training to maintain, and possibly increase the dog's proficiency. The EDD handler needs to identify the causes of the dog's substandard performance and immediately begin corrective training to bring the detector dog up to and over the minimum 95 percent detection proficiency standard. Note that

U
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004831
responses on actual substances during actual searches are not included in this computation. Search data cannot be included because it is impossible to determine the number of false or missed responses during an actual search.
Section III Instruction for completing DA Form 4607R
B-5. DA Form 4607R
a.
Page No. Enter the sequence in which the form appears within the controlled substances accountability folder.

b.
No. of pages. Enter the total number of pages found within the accountability folder. This entry should be in pencil because this number is subject to change if a training aid has to be replaced and more pages are added to the folder.

c.
Container/training aid No. Place the assigned container or training aid 3digit code in this block. The method of obtaining the 3digit code for a training aid is explained in DA Pam 19012.

d.
Organization/installation. Enter the appropriate unit and installation designations.

e.
DEA Registration No. This entry is the number assigned to an activity or installation on DEA Form 223 (Controlled Substances Registration Certificate) after the unit or activity has applied to the DEA to store narcotics or controlled substances to be used as training aids. The method for applying to the DEA for such permission is described in DA Pam 19012.

f DEA Form 222 No. The entry for this block is taken from DEA Form 222 (DEA Official Order Form for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances) submitted to the supplier for narcotic or contraband substance training aids. The methods of procurement of training aids and obtaining . DEA Form 222 are contained in DA Pam 19012.
g.
Date and time out. Entries in this column are selfexplanatory. An entry is made each time a training aid is removed from the control of the appointed custodian.

h.
Weight out. No longer applicable.

i.
Received by (signature, grade, and title). Entries in this column are selfexplanatory and pertain to the individual "signing out" or receiving the training aid from the custodian.

j.
Date and time in. Entries for this column are selfexplanatory. An entry is made each time the training aid is returned to the custodian. The entry in this block should not exceed the entry in the "Date and Time Out" block on the same line by more than 24 hours. The sole exception to this statement would be for training aids issued to a handler going TDY with his or her dog.

k.
Weight in. No longer applicable.

1. Received by (signature, grade, and title). Entries in this column are selfexplanatory and pertain to the custodian or alternate custodian when he or she receives the training aid from the individual to whom it was issued.
m. Remarks. Entries in this block are normally made at the discretion of the custodian. Sample entries may include area in which the training aid was to be used, name of dog for which training aid was issued, other training aids issued at the same time, and so forth. Entries explaining final disposition of a training aid are also mandatory. Such entries will include date, witnesses, and circumstances. Proper disposition instructions for training aids will be forwarded from the 341st MWDTS. When an entry for final disposition is made, the remainder of the form may be marked through by drawing a straight line from the upper left corner of the remaining portion of the form to the lower right corner of the
form.
B-6. Title not used.
Paragraph not used.
Section IV Instruction for Completing DA Form 4608R
a. When using DA Form 4608R for recording receipt of training aids, complete it in the following manner:
(1)
Organization/Installation. Enter the appropriate unit and installation designation in this block.

(2)
DEA Registration No. This entry is the number assigned to an activity or installation on DEA Form 223 (Controlled Substances Registration Certificate) after the unit or activity has applied to the DEA to store narcotics or controlled substances to be used as training aids. The method for applying to the DEA for such permission is described in DA Pam 19012.

(3)
DEA Form 222 No. The entry for this block is taken from DEA Form 222 (DEA Official Order Form for Schedule I and 11 Controlled Substances) submitted to the supplier for narcotic or contraband substance training aids. The methods of procurement of training aids and obtaining DEA Form 222 are contained in DA Pam 19012.

(4)
Entry No. Entries in these blocks will be sequential beginning with entry No. 1. Entry numbers provide reference lines when training aids have to be replaced.

19
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993U

DODDOA-004832
(5)
Training aid/container No. Place assigned container or training aid 3digit codes in this block. The method for assigning 3digit codes is described in DA Pam 19012.

(6)
Weight and code of substance. Enter the controlled substance code indicating the type of substance. Codes are found at the bottom of each DA Form 4608R. Weight is no longer applicable.

(7)
Weight and type of container. Enter a short description of the training aid container. Weight of container is no longer applicable.

(8)
Total weight of training aid. Entry in this column is the total weight in grams of the training aid/container.

(9)
Weight/checked/packaged by. Enter the name and rank of the individual checking the weight of the training aid/ container. Packaged by is no longer applicable.

(10)
Date and initials. Enter the date the training aid was weighed. The individual that checked the training aid must also initial in this column.

(11)
Remarks. Entries in this block are normally made to record information that explain or help document destruction or disposition of same. Sample entries are given in DA Pam 19012.

b.
When DA Form 4608R is used as documentation of the monthly weight verification inventory for a controlled substance, one form for each training aid is completed by a disinterested party (E7 or above). The form is completed in the following manner:

(1)
Organization/installation. Enter the proper unit and installation designation.

(2)
DEA Registration No. Same as in lb above.

(3)
DEA Form 221 No. Same as in lc above.

(4)
Entry No. Make sequential numerical entries beginning with entry No. 1 as the first month a training aid's weight is verified.

(5)
Training aid/container No. Place the 3digit code identifying the training aid in this block. Each month, the code identification on the training aid should be verified and crossreferenced with the entry from the preceding month.

(6)
Weight and code of substance. Entry not necessary.

(7)
Weight and type of container. Entry not necessary.

(8)
Total weight of training aid. Enter the weight (in grams) of the training aid/container.

(9)
Weight/checked/packaged by. Enter the name, rank, and unit identification of the disinterested individual performing the weight verification inventory.

(10)
Date and initials. Enter the date of the weight verification inventory. The individual performing the inventory must also initial in this column.

(11)
Remarks. Entries in this block are not necessary unless there is a discrepancy in the weight of the training aid. If a discrepancy is noted, information on the amount of discrepancy and type of investigation initiated will be recorded in this column. Results will also be recorded when the investigation is completed.

Appendix C Required MWD Information
Section I Instructions for submitting semiannual asset information
a.
Installation commanders will submit the information in accordance with AR 70081, paragraph 12, and in coordination with MACOM instructions.

b.
MACOMs will consolidate data from subordinate commands and submit the information to Commander, U.S. Army Aviation and Troop Command (ATCOM), ATTN: AMSTRSTFC, 4300 Goodfellow Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 631201798, no later than the 15th of January and July of each year.

c.
ATCOM will consolidate MACOM reports and provide a report to the AFSPA in accordance with AR 70081, paragraph 12.

d.
ATCOM will provide an information copy of the report to HQDA (DAMOODLS), 400 ARMY PENTAGON, WASH, DC 203100400.

Section II Instructions for submitting annual fiscal year projected MWD requirements
a.
Installation commanders will submit this data to their MACOM to project the anticipated number of MWDs by type (small or large breed) and training specialty (patrol/explosives; patrol; patrol/narcotics; etc.) required by their installation.

b.
MACOMs will compile subordinate command data and provide the information to HQDA (DAMOODLS), by the

AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004833
25th of March each year. MACOM requirements should be based on projected MWD gains (newly authorized asset) or losses (transfer, health problems, age, and so forth).
c. HQDA (DAMOODLS) will compile MACOM data and provide the information to the 341st MWDTS no later than 1 April of each year in accordance with AR 70081, paragraph 4.
Section III Instructions for submitting quarterly MWD status information
a.
In accordance with electronic message from CDR, USAMPOA, date time group 192100z Dec 89, subj: New Requirements for Military Working Dogs (MWD) Status Reports, installation commanders will provide data to their MACOM containing the number of MWDs by type authorized and on hand and by type the name, tattoo number, and whelp date, and type for each assigned MWD.

b.
MACOMs will provide compiled subordinate command information or"no change" submissions to HQDA (DAMOODLS) by the second day of the month following the end of each quarter (2 January, 2 April, 2 July, and 2 October).

c.
HQDA (DAMOODLS) will compile MACOM data and submit the information to HQ AFSPA, ATTN: SPLE, Kirt:and AFB, NM 871176001, by the 10th of each month following the end of each quarter (10 January, 10 April, 10 July, and 10 October).

21
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
Glossary
This is the consolidated glossary for the Physical Security Handbook.
Section I Abbreviations
AAE arms, ammunition, and explosives
AC Active Component
ACSI
Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence
ADP
automatic data processing
AE
ammunition and explosives
AFB
Air Force Base
AFH
Army family housing
AFI
annual formal inspection
AFSPA
Air Force Security Police Agency
AG
Adjutant General
AGS
Armed Guard Surveillance
AIF
Army Industrial Funds
AMC
U.S. Army Material Command
AMDF
Army Master Data File
AP acquisition plan
APSEAG
Army Physical Security Equipment Action Group
AR
Army regulation
ARDEC
U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center
22 AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
ARNG
Army National Guard

ARSTAF

Army Staff

ASA (ILE)
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Logistics, and Environment)

ASA (RDA)
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Research, Development, and Acquisition)

ASI

additional skill identifier

ASI H3
ASI for physical security inspector

ASI P7
ASI for patroUnarcotics or contraband detector dog handler

ASI Z6
ASI for patrol/explosives detector dog handler

ASL
authorized stockage list

ASP
ammunition supply point

AT
antiterrorism

ATC
Air Training Command

ATCOM

U.S. Army Aviation and Troop Command
BASOPS base operations
BATF Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms
BCU battery coolant unit
BRDEC Belvior Research & Development Engineering Center
CB close boundary
CBT/T combatting terrorism
controlled cryptographic items
23
AIR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 CCP circulation control point
CCTV closed circuit television
CDR commander
CE
U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers

CECOM

U.S.
Army Communications-Electronics Command

C-E communications-electronics
CFM cubic feet per minute
CG commanding general
CL carload
CMP Civilian Marksmanship Program
COA Comptroller of the Army
COCO contractor-owned, contractor-operated
COE Chief of Engineers
COFC container-on-flatcar
COMDT commandant
COMSEC communications security
CONEX container express
CONUS continental United States
CONUSA the numbered armies in the Continental United States
CPA Chief of Public Affairs
24. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004837
CPCO
Central Port Call Office
CPR
civilian personnel regulation
CQ charge of quarters
CRC
U.S. Army Crime Records Center
CSS Constant Surveillance Service
Cr counterterrorism
CUCV commercial utility and cargo vehicle
DA
Department of the Army
DAPSRB
Department of the Army Physical Security Review Board
DCSINT
Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence
DCSLOG
Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics
DCSOPS
Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations
DCSPER
Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel
DDPS
Dual Driver Protective Service
DEA
Drug Enforcement Administration
DEFCON
defense readiness condition
DEH
Director of Engineering and Housing
DLA
Defense Logistics Agency
DNA
Defense Nuclear Agency
DOD
Department of Defense
25
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
DODD
Department of Defense directive
DOL
Director of Logistics
DPDO
Defense Property Disposal Office
DRMO
Defense Reutilization Marketing Offices
DTS
Defense Transportation System
DUSD(P)
Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
EDD
explosives detector dog
ENTNAC
Entrance National Agency Check
EOC
Emergency Operations Center
EOD
explosive ordnance disposal
FAA
Federal Aviation Administration
FBI
Federal Bureau of Investigation
FISO
Force Integration Staff Officer
FM
field manual
FMS
foreign military sales
FOA
field operating agency
FOB
free on board
FSC
Federal supply classification
FY
fiscal year
GBL
Government bill of lading
26. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
GOCO Government-owned, contractor-operated
GOGO Government-owned, Government-operated
GS greater security
GSA General Services Administration
GT general technical aptitude area
GTR Government transportation request
HQDA Headquarters, Department of the Army
HQMC Headquarters, United States Marine Corps
HSP high security padlock
HUMINT human intelligence
ID identification
IDS intrusion detection system
IED improvised explosive device
IES Illuminating Engineering Society
ILS integrated logistic support
INSCOM U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command
ITO installation transportation office(r)
JCS Joint Chiefs of Staff
JMSNS Justification for Major System New Start
JROTC Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993. 27
DODDOA-004840

JRWG
Joint Requirements Working Group
J-SIIDS
Joint-Service Interior Intrusion Detection System
JTAG
Joint Test Advisory Group
LAW
light antitank weapon
LCC
life cycle cost
LEA
law enforcement activity
LEC
law enforcement command
LIN
line item number
LOA
letter of agreement
LOI
Letter of Instruction
LR
letter requirement
LTC
lieutenant colonel
LTL
less than truckload
MAC
Military Airlift Command
MACOM
major Army command
MAJ
major
MATCU
military air traffic coordinating unit
MCA
major construction, Army
MEDCEN
U.S. Army Medical Center
MEDDAC
medical department activity
28. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
MEVA
mission essential or vulnerable area
MHE
materials handling equipment
MI
military intelligence
MILPO
military personnel office
MILSPEC
military specification
MILSTRIP
military standard requisitioning and issue procedures
MILVAN
military-owned demountable container
MIPR
military interdepartmental purchase request
MOS
military occupational specialty
MP
military police
MPA
military personnel, Army
MPI
Military Police Investigator
MSC
major subordinate command; Military Sealift Command
MSD
maximum stress diet
MSR
main supply route
MTOETTDA
modified table of organization and equipment/table of distribution and allowances
MTMC
Military Traffic Management Command
MTX
Military Traffic Expediting Service
MUSAREC
major U.S. Army Reserve command
MWD
military working dog
29
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
NAF
non-appropriated fund
NATO
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
NBC nuclear, biological, and chemical
NBS
National Bureau of Standards
NCDD
narcotics/contraband detector dog
NCEL Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory
NCIC
National Crime Information Center
NCO
noncommissioned officer
NCOIC noncommissioned officer in charge
NDA National Defense Area
NDI
nondevelopmental item

NGR
National Guard regulation

NIS
Naval Investigative Service

NSN
national stock number

OACSI
Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence.

OCE
Office of the Chief of Engineers

OCIE
organizational clothing and individual equipment
OCONUS outside continental United States
OCPA
Office of the Chief of Public Affairs
ODCSLOG .
Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004843
ODCSOPS Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations
ODCSPER Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel
ODUSDP Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
OJT on-the-job training
OMA Operation and Maintenance, Army
OMAR Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve
OPA Other Procurement, Army
OPLAN operation plan
OPM Office of Personnel Management
OPSEC operations security
OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense
pam pamphlet
PAO public affairs officer
PAP personnel assistance point
PARR Program Analysis Resource Review
PCP phencyclidine
PCS permanent change of station
PDIP Program Development Increment Package
PECIP Productivity Enhancing Capitol Investment Program
PERSCOM U.S. Total Army Personnel Command
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 . 31
DODDOA-004844

PIF
productivity investment funding
PM
product manager; program manager; project manager; provost marshal
POC
point of contact
POD
port of debarkation
POE
port of embarkation
POL
petroleum, oils, and lubricants
POV
privately-owned vehicle
PPBES
Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System
PS
physical security
psi pounds per square inch
PSC physical security councils
PSE physical security equipment
PSEAG Physical Security Equipment Action Group
PSI
physical security inspector
PSS Protective Security Service
PT
physical training
QPL
qualified products list
QRIP
Quick Return on Investment Program
RAM
reliability, availability, and maintainability
RAM-D
reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004845
RC Reserve component
RCS reports control symbol
RDA research, development, and acquisition
RDTE research, development, test, and evaluation
RDX
research department explosive
RESHIP
report of shir ment
RF
radio frequency, response forces
RFP
request for proposal
ROC
required operational capability
ROTC Reserve Officers' Training Corps
RSS
Rail Surveillance System
SCIF sensitive compartmented information facilities
SECDEF
Secretary of Defense
SF
standard form
SFC
sergeant first class
SGA
standards of grade authorization
SJA
Staff Judge Advocate
SIR
serious incident report
SOFA
Status of Forces Agreement
SOP standing operating procedure
33
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004846

SQT skills qualification test
SRT special reaction team
SSG staff sergeant
SSN social security number
SSS Signature Security Service
SSSC self-service supply center
TAADS The Army Authorization Documents System
TAG The Adjutant General
TASA television audio support activity
TASC training and audiovisual support center
TB technical bulletin
TC training circular
TCE Technical Center of Expertise
TCP traffic control point
TDA tables of distribution and allowances
TDP technical data package
TDY temporary duty
THC tetrahydrocannabinol
THREATCON terrorist threat condition
TISA Troop Issue Subsistence Activity
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004847
ti truckload
TM
technical manual
TMDE
test, measurement, and diagnostic equipment
TMF
threat management force
TNT
trinitrotoluene
TOFC
trailer-on-flatcar
TOVEX
water gel (explosive)
TRADOC
U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command
TSG
The Surgeon General
TSRWG
Tri-Service Requirements Working Group
TTS
technical training squadron
TTG
technical training group
TTW
technical training wing
UCMJ
Uniform Code of Military Justice
UL
Underwriter Laboratories
USACE
U.S. Army Corps of Engineering
USACIDC
United States Army Criminal Investigation Command
USAF
United States Air Force
USAISC
U.S. Army Information Systems Command
USAMPS
U.S. Army Military Police School
35
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
USAR
U.S. Army Reserve
USAREUR
U.S. Army, Europe, and Seventh Army
USC United States Code
USMA United States Military Academy
USS United States standard
WSM-PSE Weapons Systems Manager-Physical Security Equipment
WSN weapon serial number
WTCA Water Terminal Clearance Authority
Section II Terms
Access (when pertaining to a restricted area or CCI)
Personnel movement within a restricted area that allows the chance for visual observation of, or physical proximity to, either classified or protected materiel. It is also the ability and opportunity to obtain detailed knowledge of CCI through uncontrolled physical possession. External viewing or escorted proximity to CCI does not constitute access.
Aggressor
Any person seeking to compromise an asset. Aggressor categories include criminals, terrorists and protestors.
Ammunition
A device charged with explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics, initiating composition, riot control agents, chemical herbicides, smoke and flame, for use in connection with defense or offense, including demolition. Excluded from this definition are devices charged with chemical agents defined in JCS Pub. 1 and nuclear or biological materiel. Ammunition includes cartridges, projectiles, including missile rounds, grenades, mines, and pyrotechnics together with bullets, shot and their necessary primers, propellants, fuses, and detonators individually or having a unit of issue, container, or package weight of 100 pounds or less. Blank, inert training ammunition and caliber .22 ammunition are excluded.
Antiterrorism
Defensive measure used to reduce the vulnerability of individuals and property to terrorist acts, to include limited response and containment by military forces.
Armed Guard Surveillance
A service that provides armed guards to maintain constant and specific surveillance of shipments for which the service is requested. "Armed" is defined as having a firearm and appropriate ammunition readily available for immediate use. (DOD 5100.76M)
Arms A weapon included in AR 19011, appendix A, that will or is designated to expel a projectile or flame by the action of the explosive, and the frame or receiver of any such weapon.
Asset
Any resource requiring protection.
36. AR 190•12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004849
Aviation Facility A department of the Army activity or area collocated with facilities for the takeoff and landing of aircraft. The facility has the mission of command and control of administrative, operational, training, and/or logistical support of Army aviation.
Badge
A security credential that is worn on the possessor's outer garment and validates (his or her) authority for access to a restricted area.
Bulk Storage
Storage in a facility above the using or dispensing level specifically applicable to logistics warehouse and depot stocks. This applies to activities using controlled medical substances and items (such as pharmacies, wards, or clinics) only when a separate facility (building or room) is used to store quantities that exceed normal operating stocks.
Cable Seal Lock
A seal in which the cable is passed through the locking hardware of a truck trailer or railcar door and the bullet nose is inserted into the barrel and the end of the cable until securely anchored. Once locked any force exerted to separate the lockpoint from the lockbody will strengthen its connection. (DOD 5100.76M)
Carrier Custodian
An employee who has been assigned responsibility for controlled shipments containing SECRET material by the carrier and who has been issued a personnel security clearance by •the Government. (DOD 5100.76M)
Certification
The process whereby a patrol or detector dog's and handler's proficiency is verified to be in compliance with minimum training standards.
Chains
Chains used to secure racks or containers will be of heavy-duty, hardened steel chain, welded, straight-link steel. The steel will be galvanized of at least 5/16-inch thickness or of equal resistance required to force, to cut, or break an approved low security padlock. An example of such a chain is Type 1, Grade C, Class 4 NSN 401001495583, NSN 4010001495575, or NSN 4010001714427.
Closed Circuit Television
Television that serves a number of different functions, one of which is physical security. As it pertains to the field of physical security, CCTV is used to augment, not replace, existing intrusion detection systems (IDS) or security patrols. It is not used as a primary sensor, but rather as a means of assessing alarms. CCTV also may be used as a surveillance means, but if used in this way, it will augment, not replace, existing IDS.
Closed post
An army installation or activity to which ground and water access is controlled at all times by perimeter barriers with limited, manned entry control points.
Closed vehicle or equipment A conveyance that is fully enclosed with permanent sides and a permanent top, with installed doors that can be locked and sealed. (DOD 5100.76M)
Combatting Terrorism
Actions, including AT and CT, taken to oppose terrorism throughout the entire threat spectrum.
Commercial-type vehicle
A vehicle designed to meet civilian requirements, and used without major modifications, for routine purposes in connection with the transportation of supplies, personnel, or equipment.
Constant Surveillance Service
A service that is an integral part of the provisions of 49 CFR 397 (reference (b)) that a carrier must apply when transporting hazardous or Class A and B explosive materials. It provides constant surveillance over a shipment. The transporting conveyance containing the shipment must be attended at all times by a qualified representative of the carrier. A motor vehicle is "attended" when the person in charge of the vehicle is awake and not in a sleeper berth and
37
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
is within 100 feet of the vehicle, provided the vehicle is within the person's obstructed field of vision. The qualified representative "attending" the vehicle must:
a.
Be aware of the nature of the material contained in the vehicle.

b.
Have been instructed on procedures to follow in case of emergency.

c.
Be authorized to move the vehicle and have the means and capability to do so. Note. CSS does not include a signature and tally service as provided under Signature Security Service (SSS). (DOD 5100.76M)

Container Express
A reusable container for shipment of troop support cargo, quasi-military cargo, household goods, and personal baggage.

Containerization
A box or other device in which a number of packages are stored, protected, and handled as a unit in transit; for
example, CONEX, MILVAN, and SEAVAN. This term also refers to the shipping system based on large cargo­carrying containers that can be easily' interchanged between trucks, trains, and ships, without rehandling of contents.
(DOD 5100.76M)

Container on a gat car
A large box-like demountable body without undercarriage used to transport cargo that is mounted on a railroad flat car.
(DOD 5100.76M)
Constant Surveillance
Observing or protecting a storage facility containing AAE by a human, intrusion detection system, closed circuit
television, or combination, to prevent unobserved access, or make known any unauthorized access to the protected
facility.
Continuous Surveillance
Constant unobstructed . observance of items or an area to prevent unauthorized access. Continuous surveillance may be maintained by dedicated guards, other on-duty personnel, or intrusion detection systems and those enhanced by closed­circuit television.
Controlled Area
See restricted area.
Controlled cryptographic item
A secure telecommunications or information handling equipment ancillary device, or associated cryptographic compo­nent, which is unclassified but is controlled.
Controlled medical substance
A drug or other substance, or its immediate precursor, listed in current schedules of 21 USC 812 in medical facilities for the purpose of military treatment, therapy, or research. Categories listed in this section are narcotics, amphetamines, barbiturates, and hallucinogens.
Counterterrorism
Offensive measures taken to prevent, deter, and respond to terrorism.
Crime analysis
The process used to determine the essential features of a criminal act. It is a mandatory part of any crime prevention program.
Crime prevention
The anticipation, recognition, and appraisal of a crime risk, and initiation of some action to remove or reduce it. Crime prevention is a direct crime control method that applies to before-the-fact efforts to reduce criminal opportunity, protect potential human victims, and prevent property loss.
Crime prevention inspection
An on-site evaluation of the crime prevention program of a unit, section, office, or other facility.
Crime risk management
The development of systematic approaches to reduce crime risks.
38. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 Crisis management team
A team found at a major command or installation level. A crisis management team is concerned with plan, procedures, techniques, policies, and controls for dealing with terrorism, special threats, or other major disruptions occurring on Government installations and facilities. A crisis management team considers all aspects of the incident and establishes contact with the AOC.
Critical communications facility
A communications facility that is essential to the continuity of operations of the National Command Authority during the initial phases of national emergencies, and other nodal points or elements designated as crucial to mission accomplishment.
Cryptographic component
The embodiment of a cryptographic logic in either hardware or firmware form, such as a modular assembly, a printed
circuit board, a microcircuit, or any combination of these.
Cryptographic equipment
Any equipment employing a cryptographic logic.
Cryptographic logic
A deterministic logic by which information may be converted to an unintelligible form and reconverted to an
intelligible form. Logic may take the form of engineering drawings, schematics, hardware, or firmware circuitry.
Day gate
Any barriers, used in a doorway or entrance to pharmacy or medically sensitive item storage areas, that prevents unauthorized personnel access during operating hours. Such barriers normally are not the sole protection afforded the entrance during nonoperating hours; however, during operating hours, the barrier ensures positive entry control by on­duty personnel (for example, electronic buzzer control entry to the area after positive identification by receptionist or on-duty personnel).
Dedicated guards
Individuals charged with performing the primary task of safeguarding designated facilities, material, and personnel within a defined area during a tour of duty. A dedicated guard may perform this function as a static post. He or she remains within or on the perimeter of a protected area and maintains continuous surveillance over that which is being protected during the tour of duty.
Defense Transportation System
Consists of military controlled terminal facilities, Military Airlift Command (MAC) controlled airlift, Military Sealift Command (MSC) controlled or arranged sealift, and Government controlled air or land transportation. (DOD 5100. 76M)
Demilitarization
The act of destroying the offensive or defensive characteristics inherent in certain types of equipment and materiel. The
term comprehends mutilation, scrapping, burning, or alteration designed so as to prevent the further use of such
equipment and materiel for its originally intended military or lethal purpose.

Double-locked container
A steel container of not less than 26 gauge which is secured by an approved locking device and which encases an inner
container that also is equipped with an approved locking device. Cabinet, medicine, combination with narcotic locker,
NSN 6530007029240, or equivalent, meets requirements for a double-locked container.

Dromedary
A freight box carried on and securely fastened to the chassis of the tractor or on a flat-bed trailer. The dromedary is demountable by the use of a forklift truck, is protected by a plymetal shield, and is equipped with doors on each side that may be locked with seals or padlocks. All explosive items carried in the dromedary must be compatible and in compliance with 49 CFR 177 (ref (c)) or host nation regulations. (DOD 5100.76M)
Dual Driver Protective Service
A service requiring SSS plus continuous attendance and surveillance of the shipment through the use of two drivers.
a. The vehicle containing the shipment must be attended at all times by one of the drivers. A vehicle is attended
39
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
DODDOA-004852

when at least one of the drivers is in the cab of the vehicle, awake, and not in a sleeper berth or is within 10 feet of the
vehicle.
b. SSS signature and tally requirements are not required between the same pair of drivers for a particular movement. (DOD 5100.76M)
Duress alarm system
A method by which authorized personnel can covertly communicate a situation of duress to a security control center or
to other personnel in a position to notify a security control center. (DOD 5100.76M)

Duress or holdup alarms
Devices which allow personnel on duty to transmit a signal to the alarm monitoring station from which an armed
response force can be dispatched if a holdup or a duress situation occurs.

Emergency Aircraft
An aircraft designated by the commander to respond to emergency situations and provide life-saving and property­saving services. Normally, such aircraft has special equipment and markings. Air Ambulances and firefighting aircraft
are examples.

Emergency vehicle
A vehicle designated by the commander to respond to emergency situations and provide life-saving and property­
saving services. Normally, the vehicle has special equipment and markings. Ambulances and firefighting and military
or security police vehicles are examples.
Enclosed vehicle or equipment
A conveyance that is fully enclosed with permanent sides and permanent top, with installed doors that can be locked
and sealed.

Entry control (when pertaining to a restricted area)
Security actions, procedures, equipment, and techniques, employed within restricted areas to ensure that persons who are present in the areas at any time have authority and official reason for being there.
Escorted personnel (when pertaining to a restricted area)
Those persons authorized access to a restricted areas who are escorted at all times by a designated person.
Escorts and couriers
Military members, U.S. civilian employees, or DOD contractor employees responsible for the continuous surveillance and control over movements of classified material. Individuals designated as escorts and couriers must possess a Government-issued securty clearance at least equal to that of the material being transported.
Exception
An approved permanent exclusion from specific requirements of this regulation. Exceptions will be based on a case-by­case determination and involve unique circumstances which make conformance to security standards impossible or highly impractical. An exception can also be an approved permanent deviation from the provisions of this regulation. There are two types of exceptions:
a.
Compensatory Measures Exception. This is a deviation in which the standards are not being met, but the DOD component (HQDA(DAMOODLS) concerned determines it is appropriate, because of physical factors and operational requirements. Compensatory measures are normally required.

b.
Equivalent Protection Exception. This is a deviation in which nonstandard conditions exist, but the totality of protection afforded is equivalent to or better than that provided under standard criteria.

Exclusion area
See restricted area.
Exclusive use
A conveyance unit or vehicle that is used only for a shipment from origin to destination without transfer of lading, and that permits locking of the unit and use of seals. (DOD 5100.76M)
Explosives
Any chemical compound, mixture or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. The term includes, but is not limited to, individual land mines, demolition charges, blocks of explosives (dynamite,
40. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004853
trinitrotoluene (TNT), C4, and other high explosives), and other explosives consisting of 10 pounds or more; for
example, gunpowder or nitroguanidine.

Facility
Any single building, project, or site.

Force Protection
Security program developed to protect soldiers, civilian employees and family members, facilities and equipment, in all
locations and situations. This is accomplished through the planned integration of combatting terrorism, physical
security, operations security, protective services and law enforcement operations, all supported by foreign intelligence,
counterintelligence and other security programs.

Greater security (GS)
A seal tracing and inspection rail service for unclassified sensitive cargo that includes a military traffic expending (MTX) service and provides:
a. Inspection of railcars at major terminals by railroad personnel for evidence of forced entry or tampering with

seals or security devices.

b.
Name of carrier reporting.

c.
Time of inspection; that is, a.m. or p.m.

d.
Actual arrival and actual departure time from inspection terminal. (DOD 5100.76M)

Handler
A military police person or DOD civilian guard or police person who has been qualified by training and certification to care for, train, and employ a military working dog.
Handling
Controlled physical possession without access.
High risk personnel
Personnel who, by their grade, assignment, value, location, or specific threat, are more likely to be attractive or accessible terrorist targets.
Independent power source
A power source, normally battery, independent of any other source (DOD 5100.76M)
Industrial and utility equipment
Equipment used in the manufacture or in support of the manufacture of goods and equipment used to support the operation of utilities such as power and water distribution and treatment.
In flight
The condition of an aircraft from the moment when all external doors are closed following embarkation until the moment when one such door is opened for disembarkation.
Installations
Such real properties as reserve centers, depots, arsenals, ammunition plants (both contractor- and Government-operated, hospitals, terminals, and other special mission facilities, as well as those used primarily by troops. (See also JCS Pub.
1)
Internal controls (when pertaining to a restricted area)
Security actions, procedures, and techniques employed within restricted areas to ensure persons who are present in these areas at any time have authority and official reason.
Intrusion detection system
The combination of electronic components, including sensors, control units, transmission lines, and monitoring units integrated to be capable of detecting one or more types of intrusion into the area protected by the system and reporting directly to an alarm monitoring station. The IDS will be an approved DOD standardized system, such as the Joint Service Interior Intrusion Detection System or MACOM-approved commercial equipment.
Justification for Major System New Start
A requirement document that the combat developer prepares with the material developer, training developer, manpower
41
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
and personnel planner, and logistician. A JMSNS is prepared to describe the mission need and justifies the acquisition of a major new system at program initiation in the acquisition cycle.
Kennel facilities
The buildings, the kennels, the runs, and the exercise and training areas which are used to house, care for, and train
military working dogs.

Key and lock control system
A system of identifying both locks and their locations and personnel in possession of keys and/or combinations.

Keying
The process of establishing a sequence of random binary digits used to initially set up and periodically change
permutations in cryptographic equipment for purpose of encrypting or decrypting electronic signals, for controlling
transmission security processes, or for producing other keys.

King Tut block
A King Tut block is a specially designed large concrete block. It is placed in front of an igloo or magazine entrance with a fork lift. Access to the igloo or magazine therefore requires a fork lift to move the block. The King Tut block is of sufficient weight to prevent removal without a fork lift.
Letter of agreement
A document jointly prepared and signed by the combat and materiel developers when a potential materiel system need has been identified and it has been determined that one or more technological approaches may satisfy the need. Even though it may be in an early stage of development, the LOA will address the materiel system from the Total System Management standpoint. The LOA describes operational, technical, training, personnel, and logistical system unique events that must be undertaken to produce the total system.
Letter requirement
An abbreviated procedure for acquisition of low-unit cost, low-risk developmental, or commercial items. It will be used instead of the ROC when applicable. The total system definitive requirements for training, personnel, and logistics requirements are the same for the LR as for the ROC. The LR is jointly prepared by TRADOC and AMC.
Lightweight construction Building construction other than reinforced concrete or masonry (concrete block or clay brick) such as wood or metal siding.
Limited access post
An Army installation or activity that meets one of the criteria below:
a.
No permanent fences or other physical barriers exist, but entry can be temporarily closed to vehicular traffic and other movements using roads and other conventional points of entry.

b.
Permanent perimeter barriers exist and access is controlled only after normal duty hours; for example, gates are secured or manned with guards after dark.

c.
No permanent perimeter barriers exist, but vehicular traffic and other movements using roads and other conven­tional points of entry are continuously controlled.

Limited area
See restricted area.
Locked container A container or room of substantial construction secured with an approved locking device. For pharmacy operating stocks, lockable automated counting systems meet requirements for a locked container.
Locking devices
a. Padlocks, military specifications MILP43607 (High Security Padlock); shrouded shackle, NSN 5340012175068 or
42. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
horizontal sliding bolt, NSN 5340007998248) or MILP43951 (medium security padlock; regular shackle, NSN 5340007998016).
b.
Padlocks, Commercial Item Description AA1927 (low security padlock) having a hardened steel shackle and body; NSN 5340001583807 (with chain), NSN 5340001583805 (without chain).

c.
GSA-approved changeable three-position padlock, Federal Specification FFP110.

d.
High security hasps. Military Specifications M1LH43905 or MILH29181A.

e.
Hasps and staples for low-security padlocks which are of heavy pattern steel, securely fastened to the structure with smooth-headed bolts, rivets, or welding to prevent removal.

Locks Locks should be considered as delay devices only, not as positive bars to unauthorized entry, since any lock can be defeated by expert manipulation or force.
a.
Padlocks High security padlocks: Military Specification MILP43607, shrouded shackle with clevis and chain, NSN 5340012175068 or NSN 5340001881560; horizontal sliding bolt with clevis and chain, NSN 5340007998248. Medium security padlocks: Military Specification MILP43951, open shackle with clevis and chain, NSN 5340007998)16. Authorized for continued use to secure Categories III and IV AAE only until stocks are depleted or replaced. Low security padlocks: Commercial Item Description AA1927, hardened steel shackle and case, without chain: NSN 5340001583805; with chain: NSN 5340001583807. (Any questions regarding the above specifications will be addressed to the DOD Lock Program Technical Manager,. Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Code C66, 560 Center Drive, Port Hueneme, CA 930434328 (DSN 5511567 or 1212).

b.
Certain locks, such as high or medium security padlocks, provide excellent protection when used in conjunction with a high security hasp. Hasps installed for protection of AAE will provide protection comparable to that given by the lock used. Determination of "comparable protection" will be addressed to the DOD Lock Program Technical Manager, Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Code L56, 560 Center Drive, Port Hueneme, CA 930434328 (DSN 5511567 or 1212). NAPEC high security shrouded hasp (MILH29181A) is approved for use with the high security padlock to secure all categories of AAE. The hasp has a cover that protects the lock from cutting or hammer tools and inclement weather. It should be used to secure Category I and II AAE storage facilities. When replacement of a hasp on Category III, IV or uncategorized AAE is necessary, this hasp should also be used. The Natick high security hasp (MILH43905) is a high security hasp that also is approved for protection of Category III and IV AAE when used with an approved high security padlock. Hasp, pin-type, locking "T" is a hasp that was authorized previously to secure ammunition storage magazines. Magazines were secured using the installed locking bar in conjunction with a "T" pin and high security padlock. The locking "-r-hasp does not provide adequate security for sensitive AAE. It must be replaced with a high security hasp to enhance security. It will not be used to secure Category I and II ammunition storage facilities.

c.
Another lock is the cable seal lock. Once locked, any force exerted to separate the lockpoint from the lockbody strengthens the connection. Such locks are not approved for use in securing storage facilities containing AAE. The same restriction applies to d below.

d.
A complementary device to locks is the No. 5 American Wire Gauge wire twist. This is a U-shaped wire place in the hasp along with the shackle and twisted tightly in place. Another device is a wire cable of a thickness equivalent to or larger than No. 5 wire. This is placed through the hasp, a metal sleeve slipped over it, and crimped into place.

e.
Built-in combination locks, meeting Underwriters Laboratories Standard 768, Group 1 (NSN 5340013757593) are approved for use on GSA-approved Class 5 vault doors and GSA-approved Class 5 weapons containers storing unclassified material and unclassified AAE.

LOGAIR
Long-term contract airlift service within the continental United States for the movement of cargo in support of the logistics system of the Military Services (primarily the Army and Air Force) and Defense Agencies. (DOD 5100.76M)
Major disruption on installations
Acts. Threats, or attempts to commit such acts as kidnapping, extortion, bombings, hijackings, ambushing, major weapons thefts, arson, assassination, and hostage taking on a military installation. These acts that have potential for widespread publicity require special response, tactics, and management.
Medically sensitive items
Standard and nonstandard medical items designated by medical commanders to be sufficiently sensitive to warrant a
43
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 .
stringent degree of physical security and accountability in storage. Included within this definition are all items subject to misappropriation and/or misuse such as needles and syringes.
Military Traffic Expediting (MTX) Service
A service providing for movement from origin to destination in the shortest time possible for specifically identified rail shipments, and which is required for the shipment of firearms and other sensitive shipments. This service uses electrical communications between members of the Association of American Railroads, is available for either single line haul or jointline movements, and provides progress reports as required. (DOD 5100.76M)
Military van (MILVAN)
Military-owned demountable container, conforming to U.S. and international standards, operated in a centrally con­trolled fleet for movement of military cargo. (DOD 5100.76M)
Military working dog
Dogs required by the using DOD component for a specific purpose, mission, or combat capability. MWDs include patrol, patrol and narcotic/contraband, and patrol and explosive detector dogs.
Military working dog team
The MWD and its appropriately qualified, assigned handler.
Mission-critical personnel
Personnel who are essential to the operation of an organization of function.
Mission essential and vulnerable areas
Facilities or activities within the installation that, by virtue of their function, are evaluated by the commander as vital to the successful accomplishment of the installation's State National Guard, or MUSARC mission. This includes areas nonessential to the installation's/facility's operational mission but which, by nature of the activity, are considered vulnerable to theft, trespass, damage, or other criminal activity.
Motor pool
A group of motor vehicles used as needed by different organizations or individuals and parked in a common location when not in use. On an Army installation, a nontenant Army activity with 10 or less assigned commercial-type vehicles but no local organizational maintenance support does not have a motor pool, under this regulation, even though the vehicles are parked together.
Motor vehicle
A self-propelled, boosted, or towed conveyance used to transport a burden on land. This includes all Army wheeled and track vehicles, trailers, and semitrailers, but not railroad locomotives and rolling stock.
National Defense Area
An area set up on non-Federal lands located within the United States, its possessions or territories, to safeguard classified defense information or DOD equipment or materiel. Establishment of a National Defense Area temporarily places such non-Federal lands under the effective control of DOD and results only from an emergency event.
Negotiations
A dialogue between authorities and offenders which has as the ultimate goal for the safe release of hostages and the surrender of the offenders.
Note C controlled medical items
Sets, kits, and outfits containing one or more component Note Q or Note R items.
Note Q controlled medical items
All standard drug items identified as Note Q in the Federal Supply Catalog, Nonstandard Drug Enforcement Adminis­tration (DEA) Schedule III, IV, V Controlled Substances.
Note R controlled medical items
All items identified as Note R in the Federal Supply Catalog, Nonstandard DEA Schedule II Controlled Substances.
44. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
One dog-one handler
The concept that each MWD will have only one handler. Personnel shortages may necessitate assigning a handler responsibility for more than one dog. However, two or more handlers cannot handle the same dog.
Open post
Installations or activities that do not qualify as closed or limited access posts. Access to the installation or activity is not controlled during or after normal duty hours.
Perimeter fence
Fences for the security of unclassified, non-sensitive items that meet the requirements of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Drawing Code STD 8729000 Series. The minimum height will be 6 feet. Use of NATO Standard Design Fencing is also authorized.
Perimeter wall
Any wall over 6 feet tall which delineates a boundary and serves as a barrier to personnel and/or vehicles. These walls may be constructed of reinforced concrete, masonry, or stone.
Physical protective measures
Physical security measures used to counter risk factors that usually do not change over a period of time such as mission impact, cost, volume, and criticality of resources and vulnerabilities. The measures are usually permanent and involve expenditure of funds.
Physical security
That part of the Army security system, based on threat analysis, concerned with procedures and physical measures designed to safeguard personnel, property, and operations; to prevent unauthorized access to equipment, facilities, materiel, and information; and to protect against espionage, terrorism, sabotage, damage, misuse, and theft. Operations security (OPSEC) and security targeted against traditional criminal activity are included.
a.
Physical security procedures include, but are not limited to, the application of physical measures to reduce vulnerability to the threat; integration of physical security into contingency, mobilization, and wartime plans; the testing of physical security procedures and measures during the exercise of these plans; the interface of installation OPSEC, crime prevention and physical security programs to protect against the traditional criminal; training of guards at sensitive or other storage sites in tactical defense against and response to attempted penetrations; and creating physical security awareness.

b.
Physical security measures are physical systems, devices, personnel, animals, and procedures employed to protect security interests from possible threats and include, but are not limited to, security guards; military working dogs; lights and physical barriers; explosives and bomb detection equipment; protective vests and similar equipment; badging systems; electronic entry control systems and access control devices; security containers; locking devices; electronic intrusion detection .ystems; standardized command, control, and display subsystems; radio frequency data links used for physical security; security lighting; delay devices; artificial intelligence (robotics); and assessment and/or surveil­lance systems to include closed-circuit television. Depending on the circumstances of the particular situation, security specialists may have an interest in other items of equipment such as armored sedans.

Physical security equipment A generic term for any item, device, or system that is used primarily to protect Government property, including nuclear, chemical, and other munitions, personnel, and installations, and to safeguard national security information and material, including the destruction of such information and material both by routine means and by emergency destruct measures.
a.
Interior physical security equipment. Physical security equipment used internal to a structure to make that structure a secure area. Within DOD, DA is the proponent for those functions associated with development of interior physical security systems.

b.
Exterior physical security equipment. Physical security equipment used external to a structure to make the structure a secure area. Within DOD, the Department of the Air Force is the proponent for those functions associated with the development of external physical security systems; however, the Army will develop lights, barriers, and robotics.

c. Intrusion detection system. See previous definition.
Physical security inspection
A formal, recorded assessment of physical procedures and measures implemented by a unit or activity to protect its assets.
45
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
Physical security measures
See physical security.
Physical security plan
A comprehensive written plan providing proper and economical use of personnel, land, and equipment to prevent or minimize loss or damage from theft, misuse, espionage, sabotage, and other criminal or disruptive activities.
Physical security procedures See physical security.
Physical security program
The interrelationship of various components that complement each other to produce a comprehensive approach to security matters. These components include, as a minimum, the physical security plan; physical security inspections and surveys; participation in combatting terrorism committees and fusion cells; and a continuing assessment of the installation's physical security posture.
Physical security resource plan
Plan developed by the physical security officer that identifies physical security needs, and shows proposed programmed procurement of those needs.
Physical security survey
A formal, recorded assessment of the installation physical security program.
Physical security system architecture
A system ensuring that IDS components designed by the various services are compatible when used together. The Air Force is responsible for systems architecture.
Pier service
Ocean carrier booking is restricted over ocean movement from port of embarkation (POE) to port of debarkation (POD). It precludes prearranged-through-booking employing surface transportation to inland destinations. (DOD 5100. 76M)
Pilferable assets
Any asset which can be stolen and which does not fall under the other asset categories discussed in this publication.
Pilferage-coded items
Items with a code indicating that the material has a ready resale value or civilian application and, therefore, is
especially subject to theft.
Portable
Capable of being carried in the hand or on the person. As a general rule, a single item weighing less than 100 pounds
(45.34 kilograms) is considered portable.
Primary electrical power source
That source of power, either external (commercial) or internal, that provides power to site facilities on a daily basis.
(DOD 5100.76M)
Protection in depth
A system providing several supplementary security barriers. For example, a perimeter fence, a secure building, a vault, and a locked container provide four layers of protection. (DOD -5100.76M)
Protective layer
Any envelope of building components which surrounds an asset and delays or prevents aggressor movement toward the
asset or which shields the asset from weapons and explosives effects.
Protective Security Service
A service to protect shipments. PSS involves a transporting carrier that must be a "cleared carrier" under provisions of DOD 5220.22R, paragraph 1702.a (ref (d)). A shipment must be under the constant surveillance of designated carrier employees, unless it is stored in containers or an area approved by the cognizant Defense Investigative Service regional
.
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
DODDOA-004859
office. The designated carrier employees providing constant surveillance when PSS is required must possess a Government-issued SECRET clearance and a carrier-issued identification. (DOD 5100.76M)
QUICKTRANS Long-term contract airlift service within the continental United States (CONUS) for the movement of cargo in support of the logistic system for the Military Services (primarily the Navy and Marine Corps) and Defense agencies. (DOD 5100.76M)
Rail Surveillance Service
An inspection service of rail shipments. An inspection is made within one hour after each stop, if the trailer containing a shipment remains at a halt. Reinspection is made a minimum of once each hour, as long as the railcar containing the shipment remains at a halt. (DOD 5100.76M)
Report of Shipment
An advanced report furnished by message or telephone immediately upon dispatch of a shipment within CONUS for domestic shipments. A report goes to both Water Terminal Clearance Authority (WTCA) and the water port transship­ping facility for surface export shipments, or to the Military Air Traffic Coordinating Officer (MATCO) for air export shipments. The advance notice of shipments shall include the following applicable data:
a.
For domestic shipments, see AR 55355/NAVSUPINST 4600.70/AFM 752/MCO P4600.14A/DLAR 4500.3, Routing Instruction Note (RIN) 146, Appendix L (reference (e)).

b.
For export shipments, see chapter 4, DOD 4500.32R (reference (0). (DOD 5100.76M)

Required operational capability
A requirements document that the combat developer prepares with input from the training developer in coordination with the material developer, logistician, and manpower and personnel planner. The ROC is a concise statement of the minimum essential operational, RAM, technical, personnel and manpower, training, safety, health, human factors engineering, logistical, and cost information to start full scale development or procurement of a material system.
Restricted area
Any area to which entry is subject to special restrictions or control for security reasons or to safeguard property or material. This does not include those designated areas over which aircraft flight is restricted. Restricted areas may be of different types. The type depends on the nature and varying degree of importance, from a security standpoint, of the security interest or other matter contained therein.
a. Exclusion area. A restricted area containing
(1)
A security interest or other matter of such nature that access to the area constitutes, for all practical purposes, access to such security interests or matter; or

(2)
A security interest or other matter of such vital importance that proximity resulting from access to the area is treated equal to (1) above.

b.
Limited area. A restricted area containing a security interest or other matter, in which uncontrolled movement will permit access to such security interest or matter; access within limited areas may be prevented by escort and other internal restrictions and controls.

c.
Controlled area. That portion of a restricted area usually near or surrounding an exclusion or limited area. Entry to the controlled area is restricted to authorized personnel. However, movement of authorized personnel within this area is not necessarily controlled. Mere entry to the area does not provide access to the security interest or other matter within the exclusion or limited area. The controlled area is provided for administrative control, safety, or as a buffer zone for security in depth for the exclusion or limited area. The proper commander establishes the degree of control of movement.

Ride awhile-walk awhile method
A law enforcement or security patrolling technique. The MWD team patrols for a period of time in a vehicle and then dismounts for an appropriate period of time to patrol an area on foot. This method increases the potential area the team can cover, as well as allowing the team to concentrate their foot patrols in especially critical areas.
Risk
The degree or likelihood of loss of an asset. Factors that determine risk are the value of the asset to its user in terms of mission criticality, replaceability, and relative value and the likelihood of aggressor activity in terms of the attractive-ness of the asset to the aggressor, the history of or potential for aggressor activity, and the vulnerability of the asset.
47
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
Risk analysis
Method of examining various risk factors to determine the risk value of likelihood of resource loss. This analysis will
be used to decide the level of security warranted for protection of resources.

Risk factors
Elements that make up the total degree of resource loss liability. Factors to be considered in a risk analysis include the
importance of the resource to mission accomplishment; the cost, volume, criticality and vulnerabilities of the resources;
and the severity of threats to the resources.

Risk level
An indication of the degree of risk associated with an asset based on risk analysis. Risk levels may be Levels I, II, or
III, which correspond to low, medium, and high.

Risk value
Degree of expectation or likelihood of resource loss. The value may be classified as low, medium, or high.

Safe
A GSA Class 5 Map and Plans Security Container, Class 6 Security Filing Cabinet or refrigerator or freezer, secured
with an approved locking device and weighing 500 pounds or more, or secured to the structure to prevent removal.

Schedule I drug
Any drug or substance by whatever official name (common, usual, or brand name) listed by the DEA in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, chapter II, Section 308.11, intended for clinical or non-clinical use. A list of Schedule I drugs and substances is contained in AR 40-7, appendix A.
Seal
A device to show whether the integrity of a shipment has been compromised. Seals are numbered serially, are tamperproof, and shall be safeguarded while in storage. The serial number of a seal shall be shown on Government Bills of Lading (GBL). A cable seal lock provides both a seal and locking device.
Sealed containers
Wooden boxes, crates, metal containers, and fiber containers sealed in a way to show when the containers are tampered with after sealing. The method of sealing depends of the type of construction of the containers. Sealing may be by metal banding, nailing, airtight sealing, or wax dripping (for fiber containers). In key control, a sealed container. is also a locked key container or a sealed envelope containing the key or combination to the key container.
Sealed protection
A container or an area enclosed by a plastic or soft metal device which is opened easily without the use of ;% key or combination.
SEAVAN A commercial, Government-owned or leased shipping container and without bogey wheels attached that is moved by ocean transportation and must be lifted on and off the ship. (DOD 5100.76M)
Security card
An official distinctive identification (pass or card) that identifies and authorizes the possessor to be physically present in a U.S. Army designated restricted area.
Security engineering
The application of engineering principles to the protection of assets against various threats through the application of construction and equipment application.
Security lighting
The amount of lighting necessary to permit visual surveillance by security police or by supervisory personnel.

Security procedural measures
Physical security measures to counter risk factors that will periodically change over a period of time such as criminal,
terrorist, and hostile threats. The procedures can usually be changed within a short amount of time and involve
manpower.

48. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993 Sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives
See categorization of such items in appendix A, AR 19011.
Sensitive items
Material requiring a high degree of protection to prevent unauthorized acquisition. This includes arms, ammunition, explosives, drugs, precious metals, or other substances determined by the Administrator, Drug Enforcement Adminis­tration to be designated Schedule Symbol H, HI, IV, or V under the Controlled Substance Act of 1970.
Signal intelligence
Intelligence derived from communications means (such as telephone, telegraph, radio), electronic signal emitters (such as navigation radar, identification friend or foe, and weapons guidance devices) and instrumentation signals (such as telemetry and beaconry).
Signature Security Service
A service designed to provide continuous responsibility for the custody of shipments in transit. A signature and tally record is required from each person responsible for the proper handling of the shipment at specified stages of its transit from origin to destination.
a.
The initial signature on the signature and tally record should be the same as that of the carrier's agent on the GBL. When SSS is used in conjunction with DDPS, both drivers in each pair of drivers shall sign the signature and tally record when that pair assumes responsibility for the shipment.

b.
Commercial carriers offering SSS must be able to trace a shipment in less than 24 hours. The following forms shall be used to obtain SSS:

(1)
Surface shipments. DD Form 1907 (Signature and Tally Record) shall accompany every surface shipment of classified or protected material accorded a signature and tally service by surface commercial carriers. Carrier tariffs and tenders may describe this type of service under different titles for example, Hand-to-Hand Signature Service or Signature Service.

(2)
Commercial air shipments. The air industry internal Form AC10 (Airlines Signature Service Record) shall be used by regulated and nonscheduled airlines to obtain the signature and tally record. Air taxi operators and air freight forwarders providing SSS may use DD Form 1907 instead of AC10. No receipt is required from the flight crew or attendants while the aircraft is in flight. A signature and tally record is required; however, from air carrier personnel whenever the aircraft is on the ground and access to the cargo compartment containing the sensitive arms, ammunition, and explosives (AAE) is available for any purpose. A signature and tally record is also required from pickup and delivery carriers used by the airlines for such purposes.

(3)
Military air shipments. The AF Form 127 (Traffic Transfer Receipt) or similar document, will be used to provide hand-to-hand receipt control for sensitive and classified shipments being transferred in the DTS. (DOD 5100. 76M)

Steel bar
A flat bar, 3/8 inch by one inch minimum; or round bar 1/2 inch diameter minimum.
Steel mesh
High carbon, manganese steel not less than 15/100 inch (8-gauge) in thickness, and a grid of not more than two inches center to center.
Storage
Any area where AAE are kept. Storage does not include items in process of manufacture, in use, or being transported to a place of storage or use.
Survivability
The ability to withstand or repel an attack, or other hostile action, to the extent that essential functions can continue or be resumed after the hostile action.
Tactics
The specific methods of achieving the aggressor's goals to injure personnel, destroy Army assets, or steal Army materiel.
Tactical vehicle
A vehicle with military characteristics designed primarily for use by forces in the field in direct connection with, or support of, combat or tactical operations, or the training of troops for such operations.
49
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993
Tenant activity
A unit or activity of one Government agency, military department, or command that occupies facilities on an installation of another military department or command and that receives supplies or other support services from that installation.
Terrorism
The calculated use of violence or the threat of violence to inculcate fear; intended to coerce or to intimidate governments or societies in the pursuit of goals, that are generally political, religious, or ideological.
Terrorism counteraction measures
Term used previously for combatting terrorism (see definition of this term)..
Terrorist group
A politically, religious, or ideologically oriented group which uses terrorism as its prime mode of operations.
Threat management force
An action force from the installation that responds to major disruptions on installations. The TMF should be of sufficient size to manage the disruption and will usually involve a command element, security element, negotiation team, SRT, and logistical element.
TOW
A tube-launched, optically traced, wire-command missile designed as an antitank weapon system. (DOD 5100.76M)
Upper rail loc
A set screw operated variation of a "C" clamp designed for gripping the upper sliding rail which supports or guides the weight of some styles of railroad boxcar doors. Gripping the upper sliding rail, the "loc" blocks and prevents the door's roller hangers or carriers from sliding past, thereby effectively preventing the door from being moved. (DOD 5100. . 76M)
Waiver
Temporary relief from specific standards imposed by this manual (regulation) pending actions accomplishment of actions that will conform to the standards required. Compensatory measures are required.
Section III Special Abbreviations and Terms
There are no entries in this section.
50. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993

Index
This index is organized alphabetically by topic and by subtopic within topic. Topics and subtopics are identified by
paragraph number.
Certification
Authority„ 31
of EDD teams„ 23, 32, 46
of handlers„ 31
of narcotics/contraband detector dog teams„ 33

Demonstrations. See Military working dog (MWD) teams, public demonstrations Explosive detector dog (EDD) teams. See also Military working dog (MWD) teams
Assistance to nonDOD authorities„ 47
Certification of„ 23, 32, 46
Proficiency standard„ 34, 46
Training aids„ 34, 36
Training of„ 32, 36, 46
VIP missions„ 48

Handlers
Certification of„ 31
For EDDs„ 46, 47
For narcotics/contraband detector dogs„ 45
For patrol dogs„ 44
Prerequisites„ 31
Replacement of„ 23
Responsibilities„ 41, 53
Training of„ 31

Inspections. See Military working dog (MWD) teams, inspection of Kennel facilities
Construction standards„ 51
Inspection of„ 61
Requirement for„ 21, 51
Visits to„ 41
Warning signs„ 52

Kennelmaster„ 31
Military working dogs (MWD).

Administrative records of„ 62, 63
Care of„ 53
Employment of„ 41, 43
Feeding of„ 53, 54
Inspection of„ 61
Medical records of„ 24, 41, 62
Overseas assignments of„ 24, 25
Physical examinations of„ 24, 55
Prerequisites„ 31
Replacement of„ 23
Requisitioning of„ 22, 23
Status reporting of„ 21
Training of„ 31, 43
Transfer of„ 62, 63, 64
Transporting of„ 24, 52, 64
Use of force„ 42
Veterinary care of„ 24, 53, 54, 55, 61

Military working dog (MWD) teams.
Authorization for„ 21
51
AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993.
DODDOA-004864

Incident reports„ 41
Inspection of„ 61
Public demonstrations„ 41
Replacement of„ 23
Requisitioning of„ 23
Travel of„ 41

Mobile patrols„ 44 Narcotics/contraband detector dog teams. See also military working dog (MWD) teams
Certification of„ 33
Employment of„ 45
Proficiency standard„ 33, 34
Training aids„ 34, 35
Training of„ 33, 34, 45

One dog one handler policy„ 23, 41
Patrol dogs. See also Military working dogs (MWD)

Employment of„ 44
Training of„ 44
Use of force„ 42

Responsibilities
COE„ 14
DCSLOG„ 14
DCSOPS„ 14
Installation commander„ 14, 21, 42, 61
MACOMs„ 14
TRADOC„ 14
ATCOM„ 14
TSG„ 14

Training
Aids„ 34, 35, 36
Assistance teams„ 37
Of EDD teams„ 32, 36, 46
Of handlers„ 31
Of MWDs„ 31, 43
Narcotics/contraband detector dog teams„ 33, 34, 45 .
OJT„ 31
Of patrol dogs,, 44

Training aids„ 34, 35, 36 Transfers. See Military working dogs (MWD), transfer of
Use of force„ 42
Vaccinations„ 24 Vehicles Modified for mobile patrol„ 44 Veterinarian. See Military Working Dogs (MWD), veterinary care Very important person (VIP) missions„ 48
Warning signs„ 52 Weapons„ 44
52. AR 190-12 • 30 September 1993

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