Army Detainee Operations Report: DOD Questionnaire of Official re: Detainee Operations

An Army questionnaire including a series of questions given to a solider regarding soldier training, soldier morale and the treatment of detainees. The handwritten responses are mostly illegible or redacted.
The soldier recalled a juvenile detainee with TB being sent to the wrong facility and was incorrectly classified. Also, responded that the Rules of Engagement changed depending on how the detainee was classified, "was confusing and changing all the time."

Doc_type: 
Interview
Doc_date: 
Saturday, April 3, 2004
Doc_rel_date: 
Thursday, July 14, 2005
Doc_text: 

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MP BDE COMMANDER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS
(b)(6)-4 & (b)(7)(C)-4
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Duty Position (15)(6)-4DHow Long in Job 41_05

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Interviewer D How Long in Country 0_A40.-1ic
1. What references/standards/publications/SOPs do you require your subordinates to
use for Detainee Operations? (1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 4.1) AR 190-8, DoD Directive 5100.77, 1949
Geneva Convention, FM 3-19.40, These are the primary source for standards and doctrine concerning

Detainee Operations).
:b)(2)-3
2. What MP units under your command operate US military controlled InternmenttS
Facilities? (Battalion and Company) How many Internment Facilities under U.S.
Military Control, do you operate? Where are they positioned across the Theater? Have
you visited any of DIV /BDE Collection Points? (1.3, 1.7, 2.1, 4.1) (FM 3-19.40, Appendix

D, Table D, Lists and provides details of MP organizations and their duties regarding internment facilities.)
FM 3-19.40, Ch 2, all MP commanders and staff members must be familiar with applicable ARs, Army
l irectives, and international laws necessary for the successful operation of IR and confinement fa•ilitipq

'13X2)-3
3. What are the policies on the establishment of Internment facilities? How do you ensure the '
units are operating these locations/facilities under the provisions of the Geneva Convention and AR 190-8(ROE, Interrogation Techniques, general orders humane treatment, etc)? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-1, Internment facilities will be
established in the communications zone of each theater of operations for the purpose of receiving,
accounting for, administering, and logistically supporting EPW/RP. Para 3-2 a. The operation of all EPW internment facilities is governed by the provisions of the Geneva Conventions. !Dare 3 -2 b. The Theater commander remains responsible for the location of EPW facilities; detainees may be interned only in \)ISIt'S premises located on land and affording proper health and hygiene standards. Except in extreme circumstances, in the best interests of the individual, detainees will not be interned in correctional facilities k3S?af housing military or civilian prisoners. Prisoners will not normally be interned in unhealthy areas, or where Vtgf-the climate proves to be injurious to them, and will be removed as soon as possible to a more favorable
climate. Transit camps or collecting points will receive the same treatment as in permanent detainee camps. The internment facility will be marked with the letters 'PW' (Prisoner of War camp) and will be placed so they will be clearly visible from the air during the daytime. Other markings may be used when agreed to by the combatant commanders and approved by HQDA.) AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g. (Combatant Commanders, Task Force Commanders, and joint Task Force Commander have the overall responsibility for the EPW, CI, and RP program, operations, and contingency plans in the theater of operation involved to ensure compliance with international law of war. DoD Directive 2310.1 provides that persons captured or detained by the U S Military services shall normally be handed over for safekeeping 61.ri cto_ce
1
DAIG - 1120

DOD-016704

to U S Army Military Police, or to detainee collecting points or other holding facilities and installations operated by U S Military Police as soon as practical.)
4. Are your operations employing detainees for work? If so, what are the General
policy and procedures for the Employment and Compensation of Detainees? (1.1, 1.2,
4.1) (AR 190-8, Para 7-1, b. & c., The CI will be employed so far as possible for the construction,

administration, management, and maintenance of the CI Camps. The CI compensation procedures will
be accomplished IAW AR 37-1.) AR 190-8, para 5-2, a. Establishment. A safety program for the CI will
be established and administered in accordance with the policies prescribed in AR 385-10 and other
pertinent safety directives. AR 190-8, para 7-5, The working conditions for the CI, to include protective
clothing, equipment, and safety devices, will be at least as favorable as those prescribed for the civilian
population of the occupied territory by the national laws and regulations and as provided for in existing
practice. In no case will the working conditions for the CI be inferior to those for the civilian population
emplorcj work of the same nature and in the same district.)

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5. Is there (or do you have) a policy on the ratio of guards to Detaineesif so, w t 5re"
it? is this standard being met? If not, what is the shortfall and how are your units

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gnanaging the challenge? (local sop)(1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 3.1, 4.1) FM 3-19.40, Appendix D, Tusitc4
able d-1 MP I/R Units, MP company (guard) TOE 19667L000, Assigned to I/R battalion, Duties Provides
guards for EPWs, Cls, US military prisoners, DCs, and installations and facilities at an I/R facility. Is
capable..of securing 500 US military prisoners, 2000 EPWs, 2000 Cls, or 4,090 DCs in an I/R facility

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6. What is your detainee segregation policy? (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.8, 2.1, 3.1, 4.1) ((EPWs,{Females, Juveniles, Civilian Internees (to include those that are security threats, . 0 do
those that are hostile to coalition forces, and possible HVT/HVD, and Retained
Persons, Criminals, etc.)) What can you tell me about the categories of Detainees
that you are holding? What are they and what are the definitions of the different
categories that your organizations detain? How are you organized to handle the
different categories of Detainees (EPW, CI, HVD, OD, and refugees?) (AR 190-8, para 6-
1, b. (4), CI shall be administered and housed separately from EPW/RP. Except in the case of families, female CI shall be housed in separate quarters and shall be under the direct supervision of women.) (FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-1, An MP battalion commander tasked with operating an I/R facility is also the facility commander. As such, he is responsible for the safety and well being of all personnel housed within the facility. Since an MP unit may be tasked to handle different categories if personnel (EPW, CI, OD refuges, and US military prisoner), the commander, the cadre, and support personnel must be aware ofthea-equirements for each cateoory)J2'
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7. What is the minimum living space standard for each Detainee? Who set the provisions of minimum living space for Internment Facilities? (when possible, consult the preventative medicine authority in theater for provisions of minimum living wace and sanitary facilities).
Has a preventative medicine expert given advice on
'this? (1.1, 1.2, 1.8, 2.1, 2.2, 4.1) (AR 190-8, para 6-1, b. (2) (3), The sleeping quarters shall be
sufficiently spacious and well ventilated and the internees shall have suitable bedding and sufficient
vti"..01 blankets, account being taken of the climate and the age, sex, and state of health of the internees.

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v• Internees shall have for their use, day and night, sanitary conveniences, which conform to the rules of )tia hygiene and are constantly maintained in a state of cleanliness.) AR 190-8, para 3-4, e. When possible consult the preventive medicine authority in theater for provisions of minimum living space and sanitary?or-facilities.
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,t4.A;MA 8. Are the Corps of Engineers involved in any facility upgrades/improvements in )O 01 vo:atTheater for Detainees? If so, what are some ongoing projects? What do you kno the Engineer Corps' Theater Construction Management System (TCS t
ottouAs ere you
Sok . S. aware that they have plans, specifications, and materiel requirements for Internment— "-

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‘006`tFacilities based on Detainee population? (1.1, 1.2, 1.8, 4.1) (FM 3-19.40, paragraph 6-6. The Engineer Corps' Theater Construction Management System (TCMS) contains basic plans, specifications, t
cut oaf and material requirements for I/R facilities based on the anticipated internee population. The plans can t14,14•4 be easily modified for temperate, frigid, tropic, and desert climates. The TCMS also provides t S-Ao
provides -ea specifications and material requirements for the facilities when dimension and/or population requirements
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are supplied.)
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9. Do you use Military Working Dogs (MWD) within detention facilities? (1.1, 4.1) FM 3-
19.40, 5-74, The MWDs enhance the security and safety of an I/R facility. They can be used for patrolling and det c ng explosives an narcotics.)
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10.What is the current policy to grant conditional access to the International Red Cross/Crescent to Detainees? Has this always been the policy? Are they the only NGOs that have conditional access? If not, who are the other organizations? (1.1, 1.2,
2.2, 4.1)
(AR 190-8, para 5-1, a. (5), e. (1), The CI will be entitled to apply for assistance to the
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protecting powers, the International Committee of the Red Cross, approved religious organizations, relief
3
DAIG - 1122
DOD-016706

by the theater
societies, and any other organizations that can assist the Cl. As individually determined persaboteurs or power,
commander, protected civilian persons who are detained as alleged spies or as sons
the United Stas as an occupyingGeneva
te world under theunder definite suspicion of activities hostile to the security of with the outside
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will be regarded as having forfeited rights of communication
Convention (GC) for reasons of mitary security. Such forfeiture will be viewed as an exceptional and temporary measure. Due to the seriousness of the charges, such persons will not be processed as
ordinary Cl. EPWs also have access IAW 190-8, • ara 3-16.)
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11. Explain how medical information is kept on each individual D
the hospitalization and
treatment of U.S. Army personnel and for EPWs will be used for CI.)
1 .What is your responsibility to the National Detainee Reporting Center (NDRC)?
DRC)? To the
po AtDe enter (T
What is your relationship with the Theater Detainee Reporting CDetainee
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RC- best of your knowledge, when were these centers stood up? t
(Software used, Data Base Management, Data Validation,
vqra- i Reporting System? Who has access? (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 2.2,
Contingencies, Security and Privacy, etc.)
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(AR 190-8, para 1-8, a, b, and (1) The Branch PWIC functions as the field operations agency for
to it't4.1)
the NPWIC. It is central agency responsible to maintain information on all EPW, CI, and RP and their
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personal property within an assigned theater of operations or in CONUS. b. The Branch PWIC serves as
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the theater repository for information pertaining to: (1) Accountability of EPW, CI, and RP and-60 r't
implementation of DOD policy
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tn& 13.When are Detainees assigned Internment Serial Numbers (ISNs) (from point of %..t A ILL& vs
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capture to internment? Are there any reasons why Detainees would not be assignede
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190-8, para 6-2, d., Internment serial number (ISN). ISNs for each C1 will be assigned
ISNs? (AR
according to the procedure set forth for EPW. The letters ACI@ will be substituted for AEPW@ e.g. t n tl'id "-' 4"'
.) (AR 190-8, Appendix B discusses in detail ISNs.) FM 3-19.40, para 4-16. If the 011.10(-Ck
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tyituation permits, the RIC processes EPWs at division CPs and CHAS. Assign ISNs as early as possible. 4,tviti,": VwHowever, if an ISN is not assigned until Station 1 (see Table 4-1, page 4-3), use the capture tag number, ' the manifest number, or another control number until an ISN is assigned. f S Mf 73i
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14. What are the policies and procedures for US Forces transferring detainees to other Coalition Forces/Host Nation Forces? Has this been done? (1.1, 1.2, 2.2) (AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(1) (Commanders will provide for an EPW, CI, and RP camp liaison and assistance
program to ensure the protection of U S interests per the Geneva Conventions upon the capture and transfer of detainees to a host or other nations.)
15. What are the procedures that allow other United States Government Agencies (OGA) access to Detainees? Who is the approval authority? How much notice do they have to provide the chain of command? Do Detainees ever leave U.S. Military Control for interrogation? .ow about U.S. Military Police control to Ml control? What is the
s or turnover and accountability of the Detainee? What happens if a detainee is returned to U.S. Military Control from an OGA, and it is determined that abuse has occurred? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) . (FM 3-19.40, para 3-68, The interrogation area accommodates an
interrogator, captive, a guard, and an interpreter as well as furniture. Accountability procedures are implemented and required forms are available.) (FM 3-19.40 para 3-14. Property Accountability. *Have MI sign for property on DA Form 4137 and for captives on DD Form 2708. *Return confiscated property to supply after it is cleared by MI teams. Items kept by MI because of intelligence value are forwarded through MI channels. * Evacuate retained items with the captive when he moves to the next level of internment. * Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property.)
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16. How are interpreters (linguists/translators) integrated within the Detainee Detention system (within each facility)? (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.7, 3.1, 4.1) (FM 3-19.40, para 4­
6, Request i terpreters from MI, PSOP, allied forces, .r local authorities as necessa .) ..4ur rommeinitritaritro •:
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17. What are your biggest issues concerning logistical, contra or, and interpreter
bkct5. a
14"."'„ support for Detainee Operations? ? (1.1, 1.5, 4.1) (FM 3-19.40, para 7-101, Supply functionst...o‘t u'77 in a confinement facility are the same as those in other military units. However, stronger securityno-Ave-A' measures are necessary to prevent certain supplies and equipment from falling into the hands of
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cv1.?J, P--. ..,0,r-.D;,.17" ‘,,t. 18.What are your biggest issues concerning adequate facilities for Detainees? (1.1,.,.x \i'' (.....c 1.8, 4.1) (AR 190-8, para 6-1, Discusses in detail, the standard for internment facilities for Cls.)
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19. Can you describe the in-processing actions required for Detainees? What are some f the reasons that Detainees are not accepted to the internment facility? Are capturing
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units/subordinate units properly processing Detainees? If not, what are they doing
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wrong? Is it administrative in nature or in the physically handling of Detainees?
VI 1,) ( 1 . 1 , 1.2, 4.1) (AR 190-8, para 6-2, Discusses in detail, the administrative processing by MP units of a),
0,..kbri. Cis.) AR 190-8, pare 2-1, a. (1) (b) (c), All equipment, documents, and personal property confiscation 60‘47"‘L'w-during the search must be tagged and administratively accounted for by the capturing unit. DD Form to' b 2745, Part C is attached to the property confiscated from the Detainee, so that it may later be matched to
410
that Detainee.) AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(3), (Commanders will collect and dispose of captured enemy 04(\ supplies and equipment through theater logistics and EOD channels.) FM 3-19.40 para 3-14. Property dt Accountability. When seizing property from a captive= Bundle it or place it in a bag to keep it intact and separate from other captives' possessions. *Prepare DA Form 4137 for confiscated and impounded
V5 property. * Prepare .a receipt for currency and negotiable instruments to be signed by the captive and the OAA\ receiver. Use cash collection vouchers so that the value can be credited to each captive's account. List cetvi currency and negotiable instruments on the captive's personal-property list, but treat them as impounded property. * Keep the original receipt with the property during evacuation. Give the captive a copy of the iyic1 6.6c .
receipt, and tell him to keep it to expedite the return of his property. *Have MI sign for property on DA Form 4137 and for captives on DD Form 2708. *Return confiscated property to supply after it is cleared by MI teams. Items kept by MI because of intelligence value are forwarded through MI channels. " Evacuate retained items with the captive when he moves to the next level of internment. * Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property. FM 3-19.40 para 3-14. Property Accountability. *Have MI sign for property on DA Form 4137 and for captives on DD Form 2708. *Return confiscated property to supply after it is cleared by MI teams. Items kept by MI because of intelligence value are forwarded through MI channels. * Evacuate retained items with the captive when he moves to the next level of internment. * Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property. FM 190-8, para 6-2, c. (1) DA Form 4237-R will be prepared for each protected civilian processed in an occupied territory
as a CI or dependent child.
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20. W at is the process to account for and dispose of weapons and contraband
confiscated from Detainees? What happens to personal property? (Is it disposed of/tagged along with the Detainee and is it stored properly and accounted for?)
Why is the DD Form 2745 (Capture Tag) not being used? What are units using in lieu of (if any)? ((Detainee Capture Card found in draft MTTP, Detainee Ops—this card does not require near as much data as DD 2745 (). The CPA Apprehension Form
elps offset the lack of info on the Detainee, however it is usually filled out in a
01.,(0.?Dsingle copy (not the 3 required))) Who decided on the use of the Coalition

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Provisional Authority Apprehension Form and why? (1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 4.1) (AR
;" 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(3), (Commanders will collect and dispose of captured enemy supplies and
,:\tpequipment through theater logistics and EOD channels.) (FM 3-19.40 para 3-7 and 3-8, The Five Ss andA... e.lic, ` T procedure is performed by the capturing unit. When a captive arrives at a division CP or a CHA, he is rp.k-s.. processed by the STRESS method.) (FM 3-19.40, para 5-32. The information flow begins when the
,,(.0 t•AV.. prisoner is captuAlzed a DD Form 2745 is initiated. The ISN, which is assigned upon arrival at a CHA
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or an I/R facility, is the key to tracking Cls throughout the I/R system.) (FM 3-19.40 para4-12 (for EPWs)
and para 5-28 (for Cls) "Store personal property in a temporary storage area..."AR 190-8, para 2-1, a. (1)

(b) (c), All equipment, documents, and personal property confiscation during the search must be tagged
and administratively accounted for by the capturing unit. DD Form 2745, Part C is attached to the
property confiscated from the Detainee, so that it may later be matched to that Detainee.) FM 3-19.40
para 3-14. Property Accountability. When seizing property from a captive_* Bundle it or place it in a bag
to keep it intact and separate from other captives' possessions. *Prepare DA Form 4137 for confiscated
and impounded property. * Prepare a receipt for currency and negotiable instruments to be signed by the
captive and the receiver. Use cash collection vouchers so that the value can be credited to each captive's
account. List currency and negotiable instruments on the captive's personal-property list, but treat them
as impounded property. * Keep the original receipt with the property during evacuation. Give the
captive a copy of the receipt, and tell him to keep it to expedite the return of his property. *Have MI sign
for property on DA Form 4137 and for captives on DD Form 2708. *Return confiscated property to supply
after it is cleared by MI teams. Items kept by MI because of intelligence value are forwarded through MI
channels. * Evacuate retained items with the captive when he moves to the next level of internment.
Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property. Property seized from a CI (AR 190-8,
6-3b), will be documented on the DA Form 4237-R. Use of the DA Form 4137 is not required. Property
seized from an PW/RP [AR 190-8, 2-2b(1)] will be documented on the DA Form 4137.

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21. Does the current force structure meet the requirements to run Internment Facilities?
If not why? What recommendations can you can you provide? Do your units have what
they need to accomplish the mission (personnel/equipment) without additional
support? If not, explain? What do you perceive to be doctrinal shortcomings pertaining

o Detainee Operations and how would you fix/incorporate into updated doctrine and
accomplish differently? (1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, 2.1, 4.1) AR 190-8, DoD Directive 5100.77, 1949
Geneva Convention, FM 3-19.40, These are the primary source for standards and doctrine concerning

Detainee Operations). (FM 3-19.40, Appendix D, Table 0, Lists and provides details of MP
organizations and their duties regarding internment facilities.)

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22. What is the ROE concerning Detainees? How do you ensure that this ROE is being followed and understood by all Soldiers in your command that have any contact with {"fiVeSee Detainees? What is the policy to train on the established Rules of Engagement (ROE)? {4ej
How often does this occur? Does this training include Rules of Interaction (R0941:1,... ),te
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1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 4.1) (DoD Directive 5100.77, para 5.5.1, The Secretaries of the Military Departments
shall provide directives, publications, instructions, and training so that the principles and rules of law of
war will be known to members of their respective Departments, the extent of such knowledge to be
commensurate with each individual's duties and responsibilities.) FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-29, An MP
commander ensures that soldiers understand use-of-force guidelines and the ROE established by higher
headquarters for each mission. Because the use of force and ROE vary depending on the category of
housed personnel and the operational environment, the commander develops SOPs that follow the
guidance provided. He balances the physical security of force with mission accomplishment and the
protection of deployed forces.", ROE from CJCS ISO Iraqi operations dated 251600Z Apr 03 para '10 (U)

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DAIG - 1126
DOD-016710

All commanders will ensure their personnel are familiar with the law of armed conflict and with these ROE."
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23.What procedures are in place when a detainee in U S custody dies? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1)
AR 190-8, paragraph 3-10, When an EPW or RP in U.S. custody dies, the attending medical officer willwill
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immediately furnish the camp (or hospital) commander or other officer charged with their custody before death, the following information: AR 190-8, paragraph 3-3a (20): Report allegations of criminal acts or war crimes committed by or against EPW/RP to the supporting element of the U.S. Army•Criminal
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Investigation Command (USACIDC). Deaths resulting from other than natural causes will be investigated 11.1414.e4 by USACIDC. Para 3-10 c: When an EPW or RP in US custody dies, the attending medical officer furnish
`to d°
the camp (or hospital) commander or other officer charged with their custody before death, the following information: (1) Full name of deceased. (2) ISN of deceased. (3) Date, place, and cause of death. (4) Statement that death was, or was not, the result of the deceased's own misconduct. (5) When the cause of death is undetermined, the attending medical officer will make a statement to. that effect. When the cause of death is finally determined, a supplemental report will be made as soon as possible. e. The attending medical officer and the appropriate camp commander will complete a DA Form 2669-R (Certificate of Death). DA Form 2669-R will be reproduced locally on 8 1/2 by 11-inch paper. The form is located at the back of this regulation. This form is for the use of Army only. Enough copies of form will be made out to provide distribution as follows: (1) Original-information center. (2) Copy-information center (branch), if necessary. (3) Copy-The Surgeon General. (4) Copy-EPW or RP personal file. (5) The proper civil authorities responsible for recording deaths in the particular state if the EPW dies in the United States.
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24.What are the procedures for repatriation? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, para 3-12 thru 3-14, has details on repatriation.
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26. What religious activities are permitted? (1.11.1 1,T.6) (AR 190-8, Ch 1-5, g (11, (g), EPW, and RP will enjoy latitude in the exercise if their religious practices, including attendance at the service of
their faith, on condition that they comply with the disciplinary routine prescribed by the military authorities. Adequate space ill be provided where religious services may be held.)
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26.Are you aware of your requirement to report abuse or suspected abuse of detainees? (1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 4.1) AR 190-40 para 2-1, Military and civilian personnel assigned to or accompanying a DoD Component know that they shall report reportable incidents through their chain of
8
DAIG -1127
DOD-016711

command and that such reports also may also be made through other channels, such as the military police, a judge advocate, or an Inspector General.) AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publiAy, or otenkt consequences of the incident.
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27. Do your subordinates know the reporting procedures if they observe or become aware of a Detainee being abused? (1.2, 1.6) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, 8-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. e5r) gPAt all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed
, ivet" . by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public ‘St - ,''t ry,
curiosity, bodily inju, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of
L.Itt ittindecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and with-out adverse distinction
based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of
inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH
DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)

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28. What steps would you take if a subordinate reported to you an incident of alleged Detainee abuse? (1.2, 1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. 8-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C, Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences
of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a
9
DAIG -1128
DOD-016712

prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The Cl will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other,violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a erious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)
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29. Do you feel you can freely report an incident of alleged Detainee abuse outside Command channels (IG, CID) (1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C. Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, a Any act or allegation of
inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)

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30. What procedures do you have to report suspected detainee abuse (IG, CID, Next Level Commander) (1.2, 1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C, Category 2,
Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from
10
DAIG - 1129
DOD-016713

confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the CI. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the Cl will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The Cl will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form ofindecent assault. (4) The Cl will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)
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31. What procedures are in place for Detainees to report alleged abuse? (1.2, 1.6, 4.1)
AR 190-8, para 5-1, g. Appeals and periodic review of security internment cases. (1) Appeals. The Cl
who are interned for imperative security reasons will be accorded the right to appeal the order directing
their internment. Such appeals will be decided with the least possible delay by a board of officers.
Appeals will be decided only on the grounds of the existence or nonexistence of imperative security
reasons requiring the internment of the protected person. 6-4. Internee Committee a. Election. At each
camp and branch camp, Cl will be elected by secret written ballot to the Internee Committee. This
committee is empowered to represent the camp to the protecting powers, International Committee of the
Red Cross, or other authorized relief or aid organizations and U.S. military authorities. e. Duties. (3) (c) The presentation and transmittal of petitions and complaints to the appropriate authorities in proportion to
the kind of labor performed. 6-9. Complaints and requests to camp commanders and protecting power,
a. Persons may make complaints or requests to the camp commander, who will try to resolve the
complaints and answer the requests. If the Cl are not satisfied with the way the commander handles a
complaint or request, they may submit it in writing, through channels, to HQDA, ODCSOPS (DAMO ­
ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC 20310-0400. b. Persons exercising the right to complain to the protecting power about their treatment and camp may do so—(1) By mail. (2) In person to the visiting representatives of the protecting power. (3) Through their Internee Committee. c. Written complaints to the protecting power will be forwarded promptly through HQDA (DAMO - ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC
20310-0400. A separate letter with the comments of the camp commander will be included. Military
endorsements will not be placed on any Cl communications. d. If a protecting power communicates with
a Cl camp commander about any matter requiring an answer, the communication and commander's reply
will be forwarded to HQDA (DAMO-ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC 20310-0400, for proper action . e. Any act
or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be sed.l^ ,'®C111-
to C-vcc
11 DAIG -1130 D
DOD-016714

32. What do you perceive as the mission of your unit? Describe the importance of your role in that mission. (Insight to the Soldier's understanding and attitude concerning unit
mission and their role) AR 600-20 Command Policy 2-1. Chain of Command a. The chain of command assists commanders at all levels to achieve their primary function of accomplishing the unit's assigned mission while caring for personnel and property in their charge. A simple and direct chain of command facilitates the transmittal of orders from the highest to the lowest levels in a minimum of time and with the least chance of misinterpretation. b. Commanders delegate sufficient authority to soldiers in the chain of
command to accomplish their assigned duties, and commanders may hold these soldiers responsible for their actions.
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Describe your working environment and living conditions since being in Theater. (Identify physical and psychological impact on Soldier's attitude). (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7) FM 10-
el
1 -%iv.1 21 1, Ch. 7, para. 3, 'Tactical Vision. A primary QMC focus at the tactical level will continue to be on sustainment of the soldier. Each company-sized unit will have two cooks and a small, state-of-the-art field kitchen. This provides a limited capability to prepare or heat meals and supplements. An improved containerized capability for providing responsive laundry and shower support well forward on the battlefield must be developed. Frontline soldiers require brief respites from the rigors associated with combat. A facility complex (Force Provider) will be available in which they can shower, clean their clothes, eat hot meals, and rest in an environmentally controlled shelter.
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34. Describe the unit command' climate and Soldier morale. Has it changed or evolved since you have been in Theater? (Identifies Soldier's perception of the chain of command /Ind Soldier attitude. Does the Soldier feel supported? Do Soldiers feel the Command cares? Are Legithey getting clear guidance?) 1 AR 600-20 • 13 May 2002 1-5. Command, b. Elements of command. CAP' 5 c. The commander is responsible for establishing leadership climate of the unit and developing disciplined and cohesive units. This sets the parameters within which command will be exercised and, therefore, sets Attae tone for social and duty relationships within the command. (1) Commanders and other leaders
4,;,01..\pcok.--committed to the professional Army ethic promote a positive environment. If leaders show loyalty to their soldiers, the Army, and the Nation, they earn the loyalty of their soldiers. If leaders consider their soldiers'
44-
needs and care for their well-being, and if they demonstrate genuine concern, these leaders build a
positive command climate. (2) Duty is obedient and disciplined performance. Soldiers with a sense of
duty accomplish tasks given them, seize opportunities for self-improvement, and accept responsibility
from their superiors. Soldiers, leader and led alike, work together to accomplish the mission rather than
feed their self-interest..
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12
DAIG - 1131
DOD-016715

35. Are you aware of any incidences of detainee or other abuse in your unit? AR 190-8, 1-
5. General protection policy a. U.S. policy, relative to the treatment of EPW, CI and RP in the custody of the U.S. Armed Forces, is as follows: (1) All persons captured, detained, interned, or otherwise held in
U.S. Armed Forces custody during the course of conflict will be given humanitarian care and treatment from the moment they fall into the hands of U.S. forces until final release or repatriation. (2) All persons taken into custody by U.S. forces will be provided with the protections of the GPW until some other legal status is determined by competent authority. (3) The punishment of EPW, CI and RP known to have, or suspected of having, committed serious offenses will be administered JAW due process of law and under legally constituted authority per the GPW, GC, the Uniform Code of Military Justice and the Manual for Courts Martial. (4) The inhumane treatment of EPW, CI, RP is prohibited and is not justified by the stress of combat or with deep provocation. Inhumane treatment is a serious and punishable violation under international law and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). b. All prisoners will receive humane treatment without regard to race, nationality, religion, political opinion, sex, or other criteria. The following acts are prohibited: murder, torture, corporal punishment, mutilation, the taking of hostages, sensory deprivation, collective punishments, execution without trial by proper authority, and all cruel and degrading treatment. c. All persons will be respected as human beings. They will be protected against all acts of violence to include rape, forced prostitution, assault and theft, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, and reprisals of any kind. They will not be subjected to medical or scientific experiments. This list is not exclusive. EPW/RP are to be protected from all threats or acts of violence. d. Photographing, filming, and video taping of individual EPW, CI and RP for other than internal Internment Facility administration or intelligence/counterintelligence purposes is strictly prohibited. No group, wide area or aerial photographs of EPW, CI and RP or facilities will be taken unless approved by the senior Military Police officer in the Internment Facility commander's chain of command. e. A neutral state or an international humanitarian organization, such as the ICRC, may be designated by the U.S. Government as a Protecting Power (PP) to monitor whether protected persons are receiving humane treatment as required by the Geneva Conventions. The text of the Geneva Convention, its annexes, and any special agreements, will be posted in each camp in the language of the EPW, CI and RP.
ADVISEMENT OF RIGHTS (For military personnel)
The text of Article 31 provides as follows a. No person subject to this chapter may compel any person to incriminate himself or to answer any questions the answer to which may tend to incriminate him. b. No person subject to this chapter may interrogate or request any statement from an accused or a person suspected of an offense without first informing him of the nature of the accusation and advising him that he does not have to make any statement regarding the offense of which he is accused or suspected, and that any statement made by him may be used as evidence against him in a trial by court-martial. c. No person subject to this chapter may compel any person to make a statement or produce evidence before any military tribunal if the statement or evidence is not material to the issue and may tend to degrade him.
d. No statement obtained from any person in violation of this article, or through the use of coercion,
unlawful influence, or unlawful inducement, may be received in evidence against him in a trial by court-martial. (1.2, 1.6)
I am D(grade, if any, and name), a member of the (DAIG). I am part of a team inspecting detainee operations, this is not a criminal investigation. I am reading you your rights because of a statement you made causes me to suspect that you may have committed D . (specify offense, i.e. aggravated assault, assault, murder). Under Article 31, you have the right to
13 DAIG - 1132 fi
DOD-016716

remain silent, that is, say nothing at all. Any statement you make, oral or written, may be used as evidence against you in a trial by courts-martial or in other judicial or administrative proceedings. You have the right to consult a lawyer and to have a lawyer present during this interview. You have the right to military legal counsel free of charge. In addition to military counsel, you are entitled to civilian counsel of your own choosing, at your own expense. You may request a lawyer at any time during this interview. If you decide to answer questions, you may stop the questioning at any time. Do you understand your rights? Do you want a lawyer? (If the answer is yes, cease all questions at this point). Are you willing to answer questions?
36.
Describe what you understand happened leading up to and during the incident(s) of abuse. (No applicable standard)

37.
Describe Soldier morale, feelings and emotional state prior to and after these

incidents? (Identifies unit and Soldier morale, atmosphere, mood, attitude, stress, retaliation, preemption, family crisis) D
38. Was this incident reported to the chain of command? How, when & what was done? What would you have done? (Identifies compliance, procedure, timeliness, Soldier perception of action taken and effect on unit morale.) (1.2, 1.6) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1
Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The Cl will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and with-out adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR
14 DAIG - 1133 la
DOD-016717

{
190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)
39.
How could the incident have been prevented? (Identifies root cause and perceived solution) (No applicable standard)

40.
Describe any unit training or other programs that you are aware of that teach leaders and Soldiers how to recognize and resolve combat stress. FM 22-51, para 11-5.

Prevention of Misconduct Stress Behaviors. The measures which reduce battle fatigue and prevent battle fatigue casualties should also help reduce the incidence of misconduct stress behaviors. However, additional actions also need to be practiced consistently by leadership at all echelons and by buddies at the small unit level. FM 22-51, para 1-3, Stress control requires special involvement from direct (small unit) leaders. The responsibility extends up through the organizational leaders and their staffs (both officers and noncommissioned officers [NCOs]) at all echelons. Appendix A describes combat stress risk factors and prescribes leaders' actions to control them. Leaders, staffs, and individual soldiers all receive assistance from the supporting chaplains, the medical personnel, and combat stress control/mental health personnel (see Appendix B for information pertaining to combat stress control units). If any link in the chain of responsibility is weak, it is the responsibility of the other members of the chain to strengthen it. FM 8-51, para 1-1, b. Responsibility For Stress Control. Control of stress is the commanders responsibility (see FM 22-51) at all echelons. The commander is aided in this responsibility by the noncommissioned officer (NCO) chain of support; the chaplaincy; unit medical personnel; general, principal, and special staff, and by specialized Army CSC units and mental health personnel. )
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41. What measures are in place to boost morale or to relieve stress? (Identifies perceived solution.) FM 22-51, para 11-5. Prevention of Misconduct Stress Behaviors. The measures which reduce battle fatigue and prevent battle fatigue casualties should also help reduce the incidence of misconduct stress behaviors. However, additional actions also need to be practiced consistently by leadership at all echelons and by buddies at the small unit level. FM 22-51, para 1-3, Stress control requires special involvement from direct (small unit) leaders. The responsibility extends up through the organizational leaders and their staffs (both officers and noncommissioned officers [NCOs]) at all
echelons. Appendix A describes combat stress risk factors and prescribes leaders' actions to control them. Leaders, staffs, and individual soldiers all receive assistance from the supporting chaplains, the medical personnel, and combat stress control/mental health personnel (see Appendix B for information pertaining to combat stress control units). If any link in the chain of responsibility is weak, it is the responsibility of the other members of the chain to strengthen it. FM 8-51, para 1-1, b. Responsibility For
15 DAIG - 1134
DOD-016718

Stress Control. Control of stress is the commander's responsibility (see FM 22-51) at all echelons. The commander is aided in this responsibility by the noncommissioned officer (NCO) chain of support; the chaplaincy; unit medical personnel; general, principal, and special staff, and by specialized Army CSC units and mental health personnel.
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42. What measures could the command enact to improve the morale and command climate of your unit? (Identifies perceived solution.) FM 22-103, Leadership and Command at Senior Levels, 21 Jun 1987, p. 6, - "Leadership. The process of influencing others to accomplish the
mission by providing purpose, direction, and motivation." AR 600-100, Army Leadership, 17 Sep 1993, p. 8, 1987- "Senior-level leadership is the art of direct and indirect influence and the skill of creating the conditions for sustained organizational success to achieve the desired result. But, above all, it is the art of taking a vision of what must be done, communicating it in a way that the intent is clearly understood, and then being tough enough to ensure its execution."
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DAIG - 1135
DOD-016719

Doc_nid: 
3684
Doc_type_num: 
73