Army Detainee Operations Report: DOD Questionnaire of Major re: Detainee Operations

Questionnaire asked the Major forty-six questions regarding soldier training, soldier morale and the treatment of detainees. [Handwriting illegible] [contents redacted].
Described preparation for detainee operations and treatment. Stated that there was "no formal" sustainment training or training for new personnel.
When asked "[w]hat control measures do you use to maintain detainee discipline and security in the collection point?," response was "Did not have many issues. Food, water, cigarettes, isolation used to control. Restrained disruptive detainees. No corporal punishment."
When asked to describe shortfalls of detainee operation, Major wrote, "[redacted] No tng [training] prior to deployed ... ."
Also, mentioned "Completed the mission trained for, however were not prepared to hold detainees for [redacted] day."

Doc_type: 
Interview
Doc_date: 
Tuesday, April 6, 2004
Doc_rel_date: 
Thursday, July 14, 2005
Doc_text: 

OIC & NCOIC
COLLECTION POINT
INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

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tell me • -t sources that yo use to get p icy, doctrine and standards for Detainee Operations? (What doctrine was used in setting up the collection point?) Describe the basic principles of detainee operations and
ow you are applying them. (1.1, 4.1) (AR 190-8, DoD Directive 5100.77, 1949 Geneva Convention, FM 3-19.40 I/R Operations FM 3-19.4 MP Commander's Handbook are th ice.
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applicable regulations, OPORD/FRAGO, directives, international laws and 1administrative procedures to operate a collection Point? (1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 4.1). 49,41A.A.1
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(AR 350-1 paragraph 4-14c. (2) and table G-1 Refresher training, dated 9 April 2003), Level B
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4training is conducted in units for officers, warrant officers, NCOs and enlisted personnel
, commensurate with the missions of the unit. FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-2, Commanders are familiar with applicable regulation, directives, international laws, and administrative procedures. AR 190-8 para 1-5 (4) (C), DOD Directive 5100.77, All prisoners will receive humane treatment and that the following acts are prohibited murder, torture, corporal punishment, mutilation, taking of hostages, sensory deprivation, collective punishments, execution without trial by proper authority, and all cruel and degrading treatment. Prisoners will be protected against all acts of
'violence to include public curiosity. ROE from CJCS ISO Iraqi operations dated 251600Z Apr 03 para 10 (U) All commandess will ensure thepersorrinelary fuili7ith the I/f arm conflict if. and with these ROE."/e'v,= rele, ,/ eoo•Cri_11/1.4*—z
3. How did Home Station/Mob Site Training prepare you to conduct Detainee Operations? (Did this include Law of War and treatment of Detainees training.)? (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1) DoDD 2310.1 (The U.S. Military Services shall be
given the necessary training to ensure they have knowledge of their obligations under the Geneva Conventions (references (b) through (e)) and as required by DoD Directive 5100.77 (reference (f)) before an assignment to a foreign area where capture or detention of enemy personnel is possible.) AR 350-1 para 4-14 c (2) and table G-1 Refresher training, dated 9 April 2003), Level B training is conducted in units for officers, warrant officers, NCOs and enlisted
1
DAIG - 918
DOD-016502

/
personnel commensurate with the missions of the unit. AR 190-8 para 1-5 (4) (C), DOD Directive 5100.77, All prisoners will receive humane treatment and that the following acts are prohibited murder, torture, corporal punishment, mutilation, taking of hostages, sensory deprivation, collective punishments, execution without trial by proper authority, and all cruel and degrading
treatment. Prisoners will be protected against all acts of violence to include public curiosity. (AR 350-1 para 4-14c.(2) and table G-1 Refresher training, dated 9 April 2003), Level B training is conducted in units for officers, warrant officers, NCOs and enlisted personnel commensurate with the missions of the unit. AR 190-8 para 1-5(4)(C DOD Directive 5100.77), All prisoners will receive humane treatment and that the following acts are prohibited murder, torture, corporal punishment, mutilation, taking of hostages, sensory deprivation, collective punishments, execution without trial by proper authority, and all cruel and degrading treatment. Prisoners will be protected against all acts of violence to include public curiosity. (DoD Directive 5100.77, para 5.5.1, The Secretaries of the Military Departments shall provide directives, publications, instructions, and training so that the principles and rules of law of war will be known to members of their respective Departments, the extent of such knowledge to be commensurate with each individual's duties and responsibilities.)
4. Describe the training the guard force received to prepare them for their duties.
(1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 4.1) (FM 3-19.40, para 2-49). The guard force should receive additional training in— • Riot control measures, control agents, and dispersers. • QRF actions. - Searching techniques, including the use of electronic detection devices. • Nonlethal equipment and weapons. ROE from CJCS ISO Iraqi operations dated 251600Z Apr 03 para 10 (U) All commanders will ensure their personnel are familiar with the law of armed conflict and with these
ROE." 1
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5. How does your unit conduct sustainment training for Detainee Operations or
training for newly assigned personnel? (How often does this occur and please describe it?) When did your unit last conduct this training? (1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 4.1)
AR 399 1 train' g annual ' on Law of War. No requirement for refresher training
6. What kind of security lighting do you have that ensures you have a safe and secure operation at night? How do you provide heat to detainees during the winter? What fire prevention/safety measures do you have? (1.8) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-4 e, EPW/RP will be quartered under conditions as favorable as those for the force
of detaining power billeted in the same area. The conditions shall make allowance for the habits and customs of the prisoners and shall in no case be oreiudici I to their health. The forgoing
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shall apply in particular to the dormitories of EPW/RP as it regards both total surface and
minimum cubic space and the general installation of bedding and blankets. Quarters furnished to
EPW/RP must be protected from dampness, must be adequately lit and heated (particularly
between dusk and lights-out), and must have adequate precautions taken against the dangers of
fire. FM 3-19.40 para 4-103 "...minimize escapes by examining the lighting system during
darkness to detect poorly lighted areas along the perimeter (replace burned out or broken light
bulbs immediately" FM 3-19.40 para 2-37 The engineer officer is responsible for the maintenance
of utilities (i.e. heat). AR 190-8 para 3-17(a) A safety program for EPW/RP will be setup and
administered in each camp. AR 190-8 para 3-17(a) A safety program for CI will established and
administered IAW AR 385-10.

7. In relation to where the detainees are housed, how far away are your
ammunition and fuel storage sites? Where is your screening site where MI
Soldiers interrogate Detainees? (1.1, 1.2, 1.8)AR 190-8, Paragraph 2-1 f (2) Prisoners

will not be located next to obvious targets such as ammunition sites, fuel facilities, or
communications equipment.... FM 3-19.40 para 3-25 ...Do not locate captives near obvious
targets (ammunition, fuel) FM 3-19.40 para 3-64.... MI screening sites will be located away from
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8. Describe some of the basic operations of the collection point relating to detainee segregation, captured medical/religious personnel, feeding, sanitation, etc? (Do you segregate Detainees by nationality, language, religion, rank, and sex? How are captured Medical personnel and Chaplains being used? Are the daily food rations sufficient in quantity or quality and variety to keep detainees in good health? Are personal hygiene items and needed clothing being supplied to the Detainees? Are the conditions within the collection point sanitary enough to ensure a clean and healthy environmen free from disease and epidemics)? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, paragraph 1-5 a-g, (All er0,24.46,44r
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persons detained, captured, interned, or otherwise held in U S Armed Forces custody during the.,
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course of conflict will be given humanitarian care and treatment from the moment they fall into th
hands of U S forces until final release and repatriation. All persons taken into custody by U S if: ,,...1

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forces will be provided with the protection of the GPW until some other legal status is determine. ,%
ompetent authority.) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-4. AR 190-8 para 3-4.b ...females will be . ,,-c 1 eparated from males. AR 190-8, 1-5, g (1) EPW, and RP will enjoy latitude in the exercise of ;, their religious practices, including attendance at service of their faith, on condition that they comply with the disciplinary routine prescribed by the military authorities. (2) Military chaplains who fall into the hands of the U.S. and who remain or are retained to assist EPW, and RP, will b allowed to minister to EPW, RP, of the same religion Para 6-6, g: (1) Hygiene and sanitation measures will conform to those prescribed in AR 40-5 and related regulations. (2) A detailed L/ sanitary order meeting the specific needs of each CI camp or branch camp will be published by', the CI camp commander. Copies will be reproduced in a language that the Cl u erstands and
commander.
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will be posted in each compound. (3) Each CI will be provided with sanitary supplies, service, and facilities necessary for their personal cleanliness and sanitation. Separate sanitary facilities will be provided for each sex. (4) All CI will have at their disposal, day and night, latrine facilities conforming to sanitary rules of the Army.
9. What control measures do you use to maintain detainee discipline and security in the collection point? (1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2.1, 3.1, 4.1) FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-19, The MP commander establishes security measures that effectively control housed personnel with minimal use of force The physical construction of the facility and the presence of guard personnel create the most obvious means of providing internal and external security. Maintaining a high state of discipline, a system of routines, and required standards of behavior are all measures that enhance effective security and control. AR 190-8, paragraph 3-6, Measures need to maintain disciple and security will be established in each camp and rigidly enforced. The camp commander will maintain records of disciplinary punishments. These records will be open to inspections by the Protecting Power. AR 190-8, paragraph 3-6 (Measures needed to maintain discipline and security will be established in each camp/collection point and rigidly enforced. The camp commander will maintain records of disciplinary punishments. These records will be open to inspection by the protecting power. The following acts will not be permitted; Fraternization between EPW, RP and U.S. military or civilian personnel. Fraternization is defined as improper or intimate communications or actions between U.S. Armed Forces personnel and EPW/RP. Donating or receiving gifts or engaging in any commercial activity between persons in U.S. custody and U.S. personnel. Setting up of courts by detainees. Disciplinary powers will not be delegated to or exercised by EPW/RP. Punishment will not be administered by EPW/RP.) AR 190-8, para 6-10, Measures needed to maintain discipline and
security will be set up in tach camp and rigi ly enforced. Offensive acts against discipline will be dealt with sromptly. tddiece,P
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10. What are the piocedures for the transfer of Detainees from the collection points to US Military controlled detention facilities? How is the transfer of Detainees handled between coalition forces/host nation? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-11 AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(5), (Commanders will establish guidance for the use,
trans I ort, and e acuation of detainees in I gi I support channels.)
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11. What transportation problems do you experience moving detainees during the
operation? (1.5) FM 3-19.40 para 3-54 Captives should not remain at the central CP more
than 24 hours before being evacuated to the CHA FM 3-19.40, paragraph 3-45 Captives should

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DOD-016505

not remain at the forward CP more than 12 hours before being escorted to the central CP. When
they have been processed and are ready for evacuation, MP leaders - Report the status to the
BSA TOC and the PM (through MP channels). Request transportation, rations, and water from
the FSB Supply Officer (US Army) (S4). Ensure that receipts are ready for signature. Ensure
that ipropertv is properlvlaaaed and elven to escort otistris/A •

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12. Describe the procedures you use when you in process a detainee. (CPA Forces Apprehension Form, two sworn statements, EPW tag, where do you store Detainees' confiscated personal affects (if any) and how are they accounted for (are they tagged with DD Form 2745)? How is evidence tagged? What procedures are in place to dispose of captured enemy supplies and equipment? Do you medically screen detainees?) (1.1, 1.2, 1.8, 4.1) (AR 190-8, para 2-1, a. (1) (b) (c), All equipment, documents, and personal property
confiscation during the search must be tagged and administratively accounted for by the
capturing unit. DD Form 2745, Part C is attached to the property confiscated from the Detainee,
so that it may later be matched to that Detainee.) AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(3), (Commanders
will collect and dispose of captured enemy supplies and equipment through theater logistics and
EOD channels.) FM 3-19.40 para 3-14. Property Accountability. When seizing property from a
captive—* Bundle it or place it in a bag to keep it intact and separate from other captives'
possessions. *Prepare DA Form 4137 for confiscated and impounded property. * Prepare a receipt for currency and negotiable instruments to be signed by the captive and the receiver. Use cash collection vouchers so that the value can be credited to each captive's account. List currency and negotiable instruments on the captive's personal-property list, but treat them as impounded property. * Keep the original receipt with the property during evacuation. Give the captive a copy of the receipt, and tell him to keep it to expedite the return of his property. *Have MI sign for property on DA Form 4137 and for captives on DD Form 2708. *Return confiscated property to supply after it is cleared by MI teams. Items kept by MI because of intelligence value are forwarded through Ml channels. * Evacuate retained items with the captive when he moves to the next level of internment. * Maintain controlled access to confiscated and impounded property. FM 190-8, para 6-2, c. (1) DA Form 4237-R will be prepared for each protected civilian processed
in n occupied territory as CI or dependent hild.
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13.What MP units (platoon, guards, escort, detachments) do you have at your disposal to operate and maintain the collection point? Do you have any shortages? How do these shortages impact your mission? What non-MP units are you using to help operate the collection point? Do you have any shortages? How do these shortages impact your mission? (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.7) FM 3-19.40 para 3-37. A division operates two types of CPs—forward and central. A division MP Company
operates forward CPs in each maneuver brigade AO and a central CP in the division rear area. Both CPs are temporary areae-desIgrrAto hold captives until they are removed from the
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battlefield. Forward CPs are positioned as far forward as possible to accept captives from maneuv -r el -Ts. Central C -accept ca om forward CPsnd local units.
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14. What is your normal ratio of guards to detainees in the collection point? Is
this ratio the proper mix for you to perform your mission? If not, what are the
shortfalls? Why are their shortfalls? How do these shortfalls impact your

mission? (1.1. 1.2. 1 3 2.1. 3 1, 4.1) METT-TC
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15. What is the number of personnel that is needed to move prisoners internally and externally (i.e. to the internment facility, from the BN Collection Points, for medical, evacuation, etc.)? (1.1, 1.7) FM 3-19.40, para 4-34, A transfer may be a result of
reclassification or another situation requiring the movement of an EPW. Transfer an EPW from one facility to another under conditions that are comparable to those for a member of the US armed forces when possible. Security measures are determined by MP and are influenced by the type of EPW being transferred, the mode of transportation used, and other pertinent conditions. AR 190-47, 11-3.b.(4), Guard requirements for prisoners being transported outside an ACS facility, by means of foot, motor vehicle, or aircraft (other than AIREVAC or U.S. Marshals Service aircraft) are as follows: (a) Trained correctional, military police or security personnel: Under maximum custody circumstances, there will be one guard per restrained prisoner and two unarmed guards or one armed guard per unrestrained prisoner. Under medium custody circumstances, there will be one guard per five prisoners. In minimum custody circumstances there will be one guard per ten prisoners. Trustee guards will be determined by the ACS facility commander. (b) Non-correctional personnel: It is required that at least one guard be'a SGT or above who is equal or senior to prisoners in a pretrial status. tinder maximum custody circumstances, prisoners will have two guards per prisoner. In medium custody circumstances, prisoners will have one guard per two prisoners, and in minimum custody circumstances there will be one guard per five prisoners. FM 3-19.40 para 3-45 Captives should not remain at the forward CP more than 12 hours before being escorted to the central CP. When they haye been processed and are ready for evacuation, MP leaders - Report the status to the BSA TOC and the PM (through MP channels). Request transportation, rations, and water from the FSB Supply Officer (US Army) (S4). Ensure that receipts are ready for signature. Ensure that property is properly tagged and given to escort guards (FM 3-19.4 Chapter 7 Para 7.8, The number of MP needed to operate a division forward collecting point is based on the number and rate of captives expected and the METT-TC.
16.What personnel shortages do you have? What issues, if any, do you feel your unit has regarding manning or personnel resourcing in conducting Detention Operations? (1.7, 2.1, 3.1)(FM 3-19.4 Chapter 7 Para 7.8, The number of MP needed to
operate a division forward collecting point is based on the number and rate of captives expected and the p12Wr-TC.
17. What equipment shortages (USR) are affecting your ability to perform detainee operations? What other equipment is the unit experiencing as a shortfall concerning detainee operations, (i.e., restraints, uniforms, CIF items, weapons, etc.)? What major shortfalls has the unit encountered in regards to materiel and
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18. Describe how the unit plans and procures logistical support to include: transportation, subsistence, organizational, and NBC clothing and equipment items, mail collection and distribution, laundry, and bath equipment ISO DO. (1.1, 1.2,1.4) AR 190-8, paragraph 1-4g(2), (Commanders will plan and procure logistical
support to include: transportation, subsistence, personal, organizational and NBC clothing and equi m t ite , mai Ilec pn nd dist 'bution, lagirynpr bath for DO.)
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19.What logistical support do you receive to run this Facility? What types of supplies is greater in-demand for the unit during detainee operations? And are these items regularly filled? (1.5) (AR 190-8 para 1-4 g (2), Should include:
transportation, subsistence, personal, organizational and NBC clothing and equipment items, mail collection and distribution, laundry and bath.) METT-TC
20. What procedures do you have in place to ensure Soldiers and leaders understand the use of force and rules of engagement for the collection point? (1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 4.1) FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-29, An MP commander ensures that
7 DAIG - 924
soldiers understand use-of-force guidelines and the ROE established by higher headquarters for each mission. Because the use of force and ROE vary depending on the category of housed personnel and the operational environment, the commander develops SOPs that follow the guidance provided. He balances the physical security of force with mission accomplishment and the protection of deployed forces. ROE from CJCS ISO Iraqi operations dated 251600Z Apr 03 para 10 (U) All commanders will ensure their personnel are familiar with the law of armed conflict and with these ROE."
21.What are the unit's procedures for the interrogation/questioning of Detainees? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, paragraph 2-1d, (The use of physical or mental torture or any coercion to compel prisoners to provide information is prohibited. Detainees may voluntarily cooperate with PSYOP personnel in the development, evaluation, or dissemination of PSYOP messages or products. Detainees may not be threatened, insulted, or exposed to unpleasant or disparate treatment of any kind because of their refusal to answer questions. Intelligence or coun erintelli.ence eersonnel wilI normall .erforrn Interrogations.)
22. What kind of stress counseling are Soldiers/Guards provided? (1.1, 1.2, 2.1,4.1) FM 3-19.40, paragraph 2-48, Personnel assigned or attached to I/R facilities are trained on the care and control of housed personnel. They are fully cognizant of the provisions of the Geneva and UN Conventions and applicable regulations as they apply to the treatment of housed personnel. A formal training program should include - stress management techniques. AR 190-8, Paragraph 1-5, (4) The inhumane treatment of EPW, CI, RP is prohibited and is not justified by
the stress of combat or with deep provocation. Inhumane treatment is a serious and punishable viol ion under int national law and theVform Code of Milit y Justic(UCMJ).
23. Do you maintain a separate site for sick or wounded Detainees? If so where is it and how does your unit maintain the security and safeguarding of Detainees there? How about female Detainees? How and where do you house them? (1.1,1.2, 1.8, 2.1, 3.1) AR 190-8 para 3-4.i.(2) Every camp will have an infirmary AR 190-8 para 3­
4. b s 'II be separated irm ale
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24. What type of Medical personnel/units are available in support of medical treatment of detainees? (1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 4.1) AR 190-8 para 1-4g(6) (The commander should identify requirements for Army Medical units in support of the EPW, CI, and RP program and ensure that the medical annex of OPLANs, OPORDs, and CONPLANs include procedure for treatment of EPW, CI, RP, and ODs. a. Medical support specifically includes: First aid and all sanitary aspects of food service including provisions for potable water, pest management, and entomological support. b. Preventive Medicine: Reviewing, recommending, and coordinating the use and assignment of medically trained EPW, CI, RP, and OD personnel and medical material?
Establishing policy for medical repatriation of EPW, CI, and RP and monitoring the actions of the Mize jot,./I,/
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25. Are Detainees given the latitude to practice their religion? Is there a chaplain available to minister to the detainees? Is the chaplain a Retained Personnel, US Forces, or a civilian? (1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 4.1) AR 190-8, 1-5, g (1) EPW, and RP will enjoy latitude in the exercise of their religious practices, including attendance at service of their faith, on
condition that they comply with the disciplinary routine prescribed by the military authorities. Adequate space will be provided where religious service may held. (2) Military chaplains who fall into the hands of the U.S. and who remain or are retained to assist EPW, and RP, will be allowed to minister to EPW, RP, of the same religion AR 190-8, para 6-17.a.(1) Cis will be encouraged to
part' 'ate in relig • s 'ractic
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26. Describe the latrine facilities for Detainees' use (do they have access to it day and night and does it conform to the rules of hygiene and do females have separate facilities). How are they cleaned and how often and by whom? Where do they bathe and conduct other personal hygiene (this will depend how long it takes to evacuate Detainees to U.S. Military Controlled Detention Facilities-12 hours is the standard)? (1.1, 1.2, 1.8) AR 190-8 para 3-4.i.(1) paraphrased...EPWs will
have day/night access to latrines that are clean. Females will have separate latrines. AR 190-8 para 6-, • (4) parap rase ...All Clill have access te_glay/night I. trines that are sanitary.
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27. How do the Detainees receive fresh water (Bottled water or Lister bag)? (1.1, 1.2, 1.8) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-4 f(3) Sufficient drinking water will be sujltc:r/RP.
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9
DAIG - 926
28. What are the procedures if a detainee in U.S. custody dies? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-8, paragraph 3-3a (20): Report allegations of criminal acts or war crimes committed by or against EPW/RP to the supporting element of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC). Deaths resulting from other than natural causes will be investigated by USACIDC. Para 3-10 c: When an EPW or RP in US custody dies, the attending medical officer furnish the camp (or hospital) commander or other officer charged with their custody before death, the following information: (1) Full name of deceased. (2) ISN of deceased. (3) Date, place, and cause of death. (4) Statement that death was, or was not, the result of the deceased's own misconduct.
(5) When the cause of death is undetermined, the attending medical officer will make a statement to that effect. When the cause of death is finally determined, a supplemental report will be made as soon as possible. e. The attending medical officer and the appropriate camp commander will complete a DA Form 2669-R (Certificate of Death). DA Form 2669-R will be reproduced locally on 8 1/2 by 11-inch paper. The form is located at the back of this regulation. This form is for the use of Army only. Enough copies of form will be made out to provide distribution as follows: (1) Original—information center. (2) Copy—information center (branch), if necessary. (3) Copy—The Surgeon General. (4) Copy—EPW or RP personal file. (5) The proper civil authorities responsible for di aths in th:, particular state if t,-dies in the Unit-• qtates. /
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29.
What AARs or lessons learned have you written or received regarding detainee operaiV Ca ..eWopy? (pr ferabl on disk) (2.1, 2.2)

30.
Are you aware of your requirement to report abuse or suspected abuse of detainees? (1.1, 1.2, 4.1) AR 190-40 para 2-1, Military and civilian personnel assigned to or accompanying a DoD Component know that they shall report reportable incidents through their chain of command and that such reports also may also be made through other channels, such as the military police, a judge advocate, or an Inspector General.) AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to

HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the inc ent.
10
DAIG - 927
31. Do your subordinates know the reporting procedures if they observe or become aware of a Detainee being abused? (1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 4.1) AR 190-40 para 2-1, Military and civilian personnel assigned to or accompanying a DoD Component know that they
shall report reportable incidents through their chain of command and that such reports also may
also be made through other channels, such as the military police, a judge advocate, or an
Inspector General. AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual
or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following:
g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Rep t. Rep rting instructions,jn AR 190-40 will be used.)
22-ale-GALSZ-
32. What steps would you take if a subordinate reported to you an incident of alleged Detainee abuse? (1.2, 1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, BA . Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of
the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C, Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or
alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190­
8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1)
No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition
11
DAIG - 928

against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident port. reporting instructions i • R 190-40 will be sed.)
4 I / #
33. Do you feel you can freely report an incident of alleged Detainee abuse outside Command channels (IG, CID) (1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following:
b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C. Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the Cl will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane
treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310,0400 as a erious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in R 190-40 ill be used.)
4. , / 1
34. What procedures do you have to report suspected detainee abuse (IG, CID, Next Level Commander) (1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 4.1) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War
12
DAIG - 929
DOD-016513

crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C, Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8,5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such
as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and without adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious
IncicjQfit eR_ort. porting. 0-40.2g1t14e used.)
rp instructions in Al-
c.
35. What systems are in place for detainees to report alleged abuse? (1.1, 1.2,
1.6, 4.1) AR 190-8, para 5-1, g. Appeals and periodic review of security internment cases. (1) Appeals. The CI who are interned for imperative security reasons will be accorded the right to appeal the order directing their internment. Such appeals will be decided with the least possible delay by a board of officers. Appeals will be decided only on the grounds of the existence or nonexistence of imperative security reasons requiring the internment of the protected person. 6­
4. Internee Committee a. Election. At each camp and branch camp, CI will be elected by secret written ballot to the Internee Committee. This committee is empowered to represent the camp to the protecting powers, International Committee of the Red Cross, or other authorized relief or aid organizations and U.S. military authorities. e. Duties. (3) (c) The presentation and transmittal of petitions and complaints to the appropriate authorities in proportion to the kind of labor performed. 6-9. Complaints and requests to camp commanders and protecting power, a. Persons may make
complaints or requests to the camp commander, who will try to resolve the complaints and answer the requests. If the CI are not satisfied with the way the commander handles a complaint or request, they may submit it in writing, through channels, to HQDA, ODCSOPS (DAMO - ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC 20310-0400. b. Persons exercising the right to complain to the protecting power about their treatment and camp may do so—(1) By mail. (2) In person to the visiting representatives of the protecting power. (3) Through their Internee Committee. c. Written complaints to the protecting power will be forwarded promptly through HQDA (DAMO - ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC 20310-0400. A separate letter with the comments of the camp commander will be included. Military endorsements will not be placed on any CI communications.
d. If a protecting power communicates with a CI camp commander about any matter requiring an
answer, the communication and commander's reply will be forwarded to HQDA (DAMO-ODL) NPWIC, WASH DC 20310-0400, for proper action. e. Any act or allegation of inhumane
j.de rya)/
13
DAIG - 930

treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report_ Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.
36. What do you perceive as the mission of your unit? Describe the importance of your role in that mission. (insight to the Soldier's understanding and attitude
concerning unit mission and their role) AR 600-20 Command Policy 2-1. Chain of Command
a. The chain of command assists commanders at all levels to achieve their primary function of accomplishing the unit's assigned mission while caring for personnel and property in their charge. A simple and direct chain of command facilitates the transmittal of orders from the highest to the lowest levels in a minimum of time and with the least chance of misinterpretation. b. Commanders delegate sufficient authority to soldiers in the chain of command to accomplish their assigned duti-s, and co/-nder may hold these soldiers respo sible fy their actions.
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37. Describe your working environment and living conditions since being in Theater. (Identify physical and psychological impact on Soldier's attitude). (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7) FM 10-1, Ch. 7, para. 3, "Tactical Vision. A primary QMC focus at the tactical level will continue to be on sustainment of the soldier. Each company-sized unit will have two cooks and a small, state-of-the-art field kitchen. This provides a limited capability to prepare or heat meals and supplements. An improved containerized capability for providing responsive laundry and shower support well forward on the battlefield must be developed. Frontline soldiers require brief respites from the rigors associated with combat. A facility complex (Force Provider) will be
available in which they can shower, clean their clothes, eat hot meals, and rest in an env'ronmentally ontrolle shelter
38. Describe the unit command climate and Soldier morale. Has it changed or evolved since you have been in Theater? (Identifies Soldier's perception of the chain of command and Soldier attitude. Does the Soldier feel supported? Do Soldiers feel
the Command cares? Are they getting clear guidance?) 1 AR 600-20 • 13 May 2002 1-5. Command, b. Elements of command. c. The commander is responsible for establishing leadership climate of the unit and developing disciplined and cohesive units. This sets the parameters within which command will be exercised and, therefore, sets the tone for social and duty relationships within the command. (1) Commanders and other leaders committed to the
Ati2e4Z,
Vg
Aviot-ig2-14
DAIG - 931
DOD-016515

professional Army ethic promote a positive environment. If leaders show loyalty to their soldiers, the Army, and the Nation, they earn the loyalty of their soldiers. If leaders consider their soldiers' needs and care for their well-being, and if they demonstrate genuine concern, these leaders build a positive command climate. (2) Duty is obedient and disciplined performance. Soldiers with a sense of duty accomplish tasks given them, seize opportunities for self-improvement, and accept responsibility from their superiors. Soldiers, leader and led alike, work together to accomplish the mission rather than feed their se-interest..
39. Are you aware of any incidences of detainee or other abuse in your unit? AR
190-8, 1-5. General protection policy a. U.S. policy, relative to the treatment of EPW, CI and RP in the custody of the U.S. Armed Forces, is as follows: (1) All persons captured, detained, interned, or otherwise held in U.S. Armed Forces custody during the course of conflict will be given humanitarian care and treatment from the moment they fall into the hands of U.S. forces
until final release or repatriation. (2) All persons taken into custody by U.S. forces will be provided with the protections of the GPW until some other legal status is determined by competent authority. (3) The punishment of EPW, CI and RP known to have, or suspected of having, committed serious offenses will be administered IAW due process of law and under legally constituted authority per the GPW, GC, the Uniform Code of Military Justice and the Manual for Courts Martial. (4) The inhumane treatment of EPW, CI, RP is prohibited and is not justified by the stress of combat or with deep provocation. Inhumane treatment is a serious and punishable violation under international law and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). b. All prisoners will receive humane treatment without regard to race, nationality, religion, political opinion, sex, or other criteria. The following acts are prohibited: murder, torture, corporal punishment, mutilation, the taking of hostages, sensory deprivation, collective punishments, execution without trial by proper authority, and all cruel and degrading treatment. c. All persons will be respected as human beings. They will be protected against all acts of violence to include rape, forced prostitution, assault and theft, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, and reprisals of any kind. They will not be subjected to medical or scientific experiments. This list is not exclusive. EPW/RP are to be protected from all threats or acts of violence. d. Photographing, filming, and video taping of individual EPW, CI and RP for other than internal Internment Facility administration or intelligence/counterintelligence purposes is strictly prohibited. No group, wide area or aerial photographs of EPW, CI and RP or facilities will be taken unless approved by the senior Military Police officer in the Internment Facility commander's chain of command. e. A neutral state or an international humanitarian organization, such as the ICRC, may be designated by the U.S. Government as a Protecting Power (PP) to monitor whether protected persons are
receiving humane treatment as required by the Geneva Conventions. The text of the Geneva Convention, its annexes, and any special agreements, will be posted in each camp in the language of the EPW, Cl and RP.
ADVISEMENT OF RIGHTS (For military personnel)
The text of Article 31 provides as follows a. No person subject to this chapter may compel any person to incriminate himself or to answer any questions the answer to which may tend to
15
DA1G - 932
DOD-016516

incriminate him. b. No person subject to this chapter may interrogate or request any statement from an accused or a person suspected of an offense without first informing him of the nature of the accusation and advising him that he does not have to make any statement regarding the offense of which he is accused or suspected, and that any statement made by him may be used as evidence against him in a trial by court-martial. c. No person subject to this chapter may compel any person to make a statement or produce evidence before any military tribunal if the statement or evidence is not material to the issue and may tend to degrade him. d. No statement obtained from any person in violation of this article, or through the use of coercion, unlawful influence, or unlawful inducement, may be received in evidence against him in a trial by court-
martial_ (1.2, 1.6)
I am (grade, if any, and name), a member of the (DAIG). I am part of
a team inspecting detainee operations, this is not a criminal investigation. I
am reading you your rights because of a statement you made causes me to suspect that you may have committed . (specify offense, i.e. aggravated assault, assault, murder). Under Article 31, you
have the right to remain silent, that is, say nothing at all. Any statement you make, oral or written, may be used as evidence against you in a trial by courts-martial or in other judicial or administrative proceedings. You have the right to consult a lawyer and to have a lawyer present during this interview. You have the right to military legal counsel free of charge. In addition to military counsel, you are entitled to civilian counsel of your own choosing, at your own expense. You may request a lawyer at any time during this interview. If you decide to answer questions, you may stop the questioning at any time. Do you understand your rights? Do you want a lawyer? (If the answer is yes, cease all questions at this point). Are you willing to answer questions?
40.
Describe what you understand happened leading up to and during the incident(s) of abuse. (No applicable standard)/

41.
Describe Soldier morale, feelings and emotional state prior to and after these

incidents? (Identifies unit and Soldier morale, atmosphere, mood, attitude, stress, retaliation, preemption, family crisis)
16
DAIG - 933
DOD-016517

42. Was this incident reported to the chain of command? How, when & what was done? What would you have done? (Identifies compliance, procedure, timeliness, Soldier perception of action taken and effect on unit morale.) (1.2, 1.6) (AR 190-40, Appendix B, Category 1 Reportable Serious Incidents, B-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: b. War crimes, including mistreatment of enemy prisoners of war, violations of the Geneva Conventions, and atrocities. B-2. Any other incident the commander determines to be of immediate concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-40, Appendix C Category 2, Reportable Serious Incidents, C-1. Actual or alleged incidents involving the following: g. Incidents involving prisoners or detainees of Army confinement or correctional facilities to include escape from confinement or custody, disturbances which require the use of force, wounding or serious injury to a prisoner, and all prisoner deaths. C-2. Any other incident that the commander determines to be of concern to HQDA based on the nature, gravity, potential for adverse publicity, or potential consequences of the incident. AR 190-8, 5-1. General protection policy—civilian internee, a. Treatment. (1) No form of physical torture or moral coercion will be exercised against the Cl. This provision does not constitute a prohibition against the use of minimum force necessary to effect compliance with measures authorized or directed by these regulations. (2) In all circumstances, the CI will be treated with respect for their person, their honor, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. At all times the CI will be humanely treated and protected against all acts of violence or threats and insults and public curiosity. In all official cases they will be entitled to a fair and regular trial as prescribed by this regulation. (3) The CI will be especially protected against all acts of violence, insults, public curiosity, bodily injury, reprisals of any kind, sexual attack such as rape, forced prostitution, or any form of indecent assault. (4) The CI will be treated with the same consideration and with-out adverse distinction based on race, religion, political opinion, sex, or age. AR 190-8, para 6-9, e. Any act or allegation of inhumane
treatment or other violations of this regulation will be reported to HQDA (DAMO-ODL), WASH DC 20310-0400 as a Serious Incident Report. Reporting instructions in AR 190-40 will be used.)
43. How could the incident have been prevented? (Identifies root cause and perceived solution) (No applicable standard)
44. Describe any unit training or other programs that you are aware of that teach leaders and Soldiers how to recognize and resolve combat stress. FM 22-51, para 11-5. Prevention of Misconduct Stress Behaviors. The measures which reduce battle fatigue and prevent battle fatigue casualties should also help reduce the incidence of misconduct stress behaviors. However, additional actions also need to be practiced consistently by leadership at all echelons and by buddies at the small unit level. FM 22-51, para 1-3, Stress control requires special involvement from direct (small unit) leaders. The responsibility extends up through the organizational leaders and their staffs (both officers and noncommissioned officers [NCOs]) at all
echelons. Appendix A describes combat stress risk factors and prescribes leaders' actions to control them. Leaders, staffs, and individual soldiers all receive assistance from the supporting
17
DAIG - 934
DOD-016518

chaplains, the medical personnel, and combat stress control/mental health personnel (see Appendix B for information pertaining to combat stress control units). If any link in the chain of responsibility is weak, it is the responsibility of the other members of the chain to strengthen it. FM 8-51, para 1-1, b. Responsibility For Stress Control. Control of stress is the commander's responsibility (see FM 22-51) at all echelons. The commander is aided in this responsibility by the noncommissioned officer (NCO) chain of support; the chaplaincy; unit medical personnel; general, principal, and special staff, and by specialized Army CSC units and mental health personnel. )
45.
What measures are in place to boost morale or to relieve stress? (Identifies perceived solution.) FM 22-51, para 11-5. Prevention of Misconduct Stress Behaviors. The measures which reduce battle fatigue and prevent battle fatigue casualties should also help reduce the incidence of misconduct stress behaviors. However, additional actions also need to be practiced consistently by leadership at all echelons and by buddies at the small unit level. FM 22­51, para 1-3, Stress control requires special involvement from direct (small unit) leaders. The responsibility extends up through the organizational leaders and their staffs (both officers and noncommissioned officers [NCOs]) at all echelons. Appendix A describes combat stress risk factors and prescribes leaders' actions to control them. Leaders, staffs, and individual soldiers all receive assistance from the supporting chaplains, the medical personnel, and combat stress control/mental health personnel (see Appendix B for information pertaining to combat stress control units). If any link in the chain of responsibility is weak, it is the responsibility of the other members of the chain to strengthen it. FM 8-51, para 1-1, b. Responsibility For Stress Control. Control of stress is the commander's responsibility (see FM 22-51) at all echelons. The commander is aided in this responsibility by the noncommissioned officer (NCO) chain of support; the chaplaincy; unit medical personnel; general, principal, and special staff, and by specialized Army CSC units and mental health personnel.

46.
What measures could the command enact to improve the morale and command climate of your unit? (Identifies perceived solution.) FM 22-103, Leadership and Command at Senior Levels, 21 Jun 1987, p. 6, - "Leadership. The process of influencing others to accomplish the mission by providing purpose, direction, and motivation." AR 600-100, Army Leadership, 17 Sep 1993, p. 8, 1987- "Senior-level leadership is the art of direct and indirect influence and the skill of creating the conditions for sustained organizational success to achieve the desired result. But, above all, it is the art of taking a vision of what must be done,

communicating it in a way that the intent is clearly understood, and then being tough enough to ensure its execution."
18
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DOD-016519

Doc_nid: 
3671
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73